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LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 
    
    Jul 22, 2024  
LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prerequisites

A prerequisite is designed to help students be successful. Prerequisites also inform prospective students what body of knowledge is necessary to be successful in a particular course.

If a prerequisite course is listed for a subsequent course, the student must have completed satisfactorily (grade of C or better) the prerequisite course, scored at an equivalent level of placement using with high school GPA or ACT, or completed an equivalent course at a college/university that holds institutional accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Equivalent courses must be demonstrated by submitting an official transcript, and final determination will be made by the Office of the Registrar. For additional information, please refer to the “Academic Skills Assessment and Placement Policy ”.

The college has designated English and math prerequisite skill levels for many of the courses in the curriculum. The table below equates placement test levels with a specific developmental course.

This sample course description identifies how to determine the prerequisites for a given course.

PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


Credits: 4
General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.

Students registering for PHYS 1050 must have completed successfully:

 

Geography

  
  • GEOG 1100 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems


    Credits: 4
    An introductory Geographic Information Systems (GIS) course. Students explore the use of computers in displaying and analyzing spatial information. Students acquire skills in manipulating geographic data for a variety of uses including: natural resource management, planning, health care, Homeland Security, agriculture, and others. Students should be familiar with Windows-based computer operating systems as well as file management procedures.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 .
  
  • GEOG 1220 - Introduction to Geospatial Technology


    Credits: 3
    This course provides an introduction to Geospatial Technology with a primary focus on geographic information systems (GIS) and an overview of related technologies such as remote sensing (RS), global positioning systems (GPS), and other emerging technologies. Students learn concepts and employ the hands-on use of technologies to create, manage, analyze, and map geospatial data in the context of various application areas such as business, public safety, health, environment, engineering, agriculture, natural resources, and natural and social sciences.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement and familiarity with a Windows-based computer operating system.

Geology

  
  • GEOL 1035 - Geology of Yellowstone National Park


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the geologic processes and features of the greater Yellowstone and Grand Teton geo-ecosystem including: earthquakes, landslides, glacial and stream processes, geothermal features, and other geological structures, processes, and hazards. This course involves daily hikes of at least 4-5 miles on uneven terrain. All activities will be conducted outdoors where temperatures may be cold and precipitation likely. This course is only available to registered students who are at least 18 years of age; limit to 13 students. It is recommended that students registering for this course have had some previous exposure to an Earth science class or experience. A course fee will be assessed for reservation of lodging, food, transportation, and entrance fee into parks.

  
  • GEOL 1100 - Physical Geology


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

    Students identify common minerals and rocks and explain how igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks form. Students acquire scientific knowledge about the movement of crustal plates, interior Earth processes, and external Earth processes including water cycles and resources. Students use geologists’ techniques and methods in the pursuit of scientific inquiry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0900  or equivalent placement.
  
  • GEOL 1200 - History of Earth


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical & Life (NS)

    Students learn to infer geologic history through careful study of fossils, rocks, and geologic structures. Students examine the theory of the origin of life, organic evolution, plate tectonics, and the evolution of Earth’s continents, oceans, and climate. Students use geologists’ techniques and methods in the pursuit of scientific inquiry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0900  or equivalent placement.

Health Education

  
  • HLED 1006 - Personal Health


    Credits: 3
    Students recognize a variety of personal health issues including the impact of family history on health. Students identify health risks and describe behaviors that improve overall health and well-being. Students analyze how physical activity and exercise minimize the effects of stress on one’s health and apply this to their personal lives.

  
  • HLED 1221 - Standard First Aid and CPR


    Credits: 2
    In this comprehensive program, students are trained to act in emergency situations and recognize and care for life-threatening respiratory or cardiac emergencies. Students learn skills necessary in an emergency to help sustain life and to minimize pain and the consequences of injury or sudden illness until professional medical help arrives. Students are trained in adult and pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) as well as in the use of an automated electronic defibrillation device.

  
  • HLED 2006 - Health for Elementary Educators


    Credits: 1
    Students identify and examine National and State Health Standards and Benchmarks, assessment procedures, health curriculum models/approaches for K-6, and health education lesson plans. Students also explore methodologies to integrate health education into the K-6 curriculum. Students discuss current health-related issues facing the elementary-age student, families, and the elementary classroom teacher.


Health Information Technology and Management

  
  • HIT 1500 - Introduction to Health Care Careers and Workplace Preparedness


    Credits: 4
    Students explore the health care system and examine different types of careers available to them in the administrative realm of health care. Students focus on introductory positions such as a medical secretary, coding career clusters, and health information technology career clusters as well as a brief overview of how success in those clusters can lead to management positions. Students are introduced to basic skills needed to succeed in a medical office environment including: basic business writing, verbal and nonverbal communication, professional dress and behaviors.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into HITM program and instructor approval required.
  
  • HIT 1510 - Computer Software for Medical Office Professionals


    Credits: 4
    Students explore and apply computer software used in many medical offices. Through hands-on exercises, students explore a Windows environment; create medical documents in MS Word; work with formulas, functions, and charts in MS Excel; use basic features in MS Access; and utilize common features of MS Outlook.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the HITM program and instructor approval required.
  
  • HIT 1550 - Medical Office Administrative Procedures


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to the basic skills needed to succeed in a medical office environment. Students examine the importance of effective and timely scheduling and the effects on customer service, discuss the necessity of complying with medical ethics, create and work with basic medical records, and review basic insurance used in a medical office.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the HITM program and instructor approval required.
  
  • HIT 1600 - Introduction to Health Information


    Credits: 2
    Students build knowledge of the health care delivery system with emphasis on health information management (HIM), organizational structures, regulatory and accreditation standards, and health care reform. Students explore the content of health records and documentation requirements, use and structure of health data and data sets, primary and secondary records, and discuss the data sets and what they mean to the organization. Students are introduced to the various tasks and skills performed in a health record department.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HIT 1550  or instructor approval.
  
  • HIT 2500 - Health Data Management


    Credits: 2
    Students study the compilation and interpretation of health care statistics for clinical indices and databases/registries. Students collect, organize, and present data using common data software applications to design and generate reports for patient care and related studies. Clinical data will be analyzed to identify trends that demonstrate quality, safety, and effectiveness in health care.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HIT 1510 .
  
  • HIT 2550 - Health Care Quality and Performance Improvement


    Credits: 2
    Students develop a working knowledge of the health care data and statistics necessary to address quality of care and performance improvement. Students analyze data to identify trends in the facilities that represent quality, safe, and effective patient care. Students use the analyzed data to report quality measures and initiatives that apply to the federal, state, and local regulations in the health care industry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MEDC 1700 .
  
  • HIT 2600 - Health Information Application Skills


    Credits: 3
    Students build on the foundations of health data management and the uses for the data collection and management within the health care industry. Students apply the principles of health information management to the practical situations and case studies in class. Students use and evaluate the various software applications found within the industry. Using the technology and the primary knowledge of health information management, the students analyze patient records and perform audits of patient charts and correlate the information found in the audits to quality measurements.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HIT 1600 .
  
  • HIT 2700 - Health Information Management


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the basic theories and concepts of management in the healthcare environment. Students study the functions, skills, roles, and challenges in managing health information service areas in healthcare. Students gain a fundamental understanding of strategic and operational planning, workflow, project management, financial management, human resources management and vendor/contract management.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HIT 1600 .
  
  • HIT 2970 - Professional Practice Experience (HIM)


    Credits: 2
    Students gain real-world experience in health care settings. The guidelines of this course are set in the Professional Practice Experience (PPE) handbook published by the American Health Information Management Association. Students are placed in different health care settings to help them achieve the experience and competencies set forth in the handbook while utilizing management and leadership skills. Placements vary and could include a hybrid PPE, meaning a real-world placement with an online experience with a virtual lab. Students complete the PPE in a health information management setting.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HIT 2600 .

Health Technology

  
  • HLTK 1200 - Medical Terminology


    Credits: 2
    Students study the vocabulary associated with health care professions. Students demonstrate knowledge of suffixes, prefixes, root words and their combining forms, and abbreviating through testing, pronunciation, and writing. Students use and incorporate technology in their development of medical based vocabulary.

  
  • HLTK 1210 - Human Body Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students identify the structure and function of the systems that make up the human body-integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary, and reproductive. In this non-lab class, students examine body defenses, common diagnostic values, specific abnormalities in function, and how the body works to maintain homeostasis.

  
  • HLTK 2300 - Health Care Ethics


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the basic principles of health care ethics. By engaging in theoretical health care practice situations the students apply practical application of course material to contemporary ethical issues. Students responsibly develop awareness of issues emphasizing diversity of ethical analysis with stress placed on non-judgmental collaboration and philosophical reflection.

  
  • HLTK 2510 - Pathophysiology


    Credits: 2
    An introduction to the physiology of human disease processes, intended for health professions students. Students explore the nature of various diseases and conditions, methods of diagnosis, medical and surgical treatment options, and disease risk factors, classified by affected body systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HLTK 1210  or ZOO 2010  or ZOO 2015 , and recommended completion of or concurrent enrollment in ZOO 2020  or ZOO 2025 .

Healthcare Administration

  
  • HCA 3010 - Foundations of Healthcare Management


    Credits: 3
    Students will explore the foundations of management theory as it applies to healthcare and examine the organizational structure of the current healthcare delivery system and its history. Students will analyze the major issues presented to healthcare administrators and their role in healthcare facilities.

  
  • HCA 3020 - Health Informatics


    Credits: 3
    Students will examine healthcare information systems and learn how to optimize computer functions to best collect and manipulate healthcare data. Students will appraise telemedicine, electronic medical records, cybersecurity and how technology has changed the way information is stored and shared in the healthcare industry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IMGT 3020 .
  
  • HCA 3030 - Healthcare Law


    Credits: 3
    Students explore concepts and principles of healthcare policy, legal control, and regulatory environments effects on the healthcare industry and on healthcare professionals. Students will analyze specific healthcare laws that will help them, as future managers, to recognize and guide decision-making policies to minimize legal risk.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BADM 2010 .
  
  • HCA 3040 - Public Health


    Credits: 3
    Students will analyze the history and principles of public health, focusing on improving the health of populations through an evidence-based public health framework. Students will assess the importance of healthcare professional collaboration, healthcare infrastructure, and social determinants in public health. Students will also examine the differences between the U.S. health profile and that of other countries.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MGT 3210 .
  
  • HCA 4010 - Healthcare Quality and Performance Improvement


    Credits: 3
    Students will analyze the fundamentals of quality management and improvement of healthcare processes, delivery, and outcomes. Students will address the concepts, topics, and practices needed to address quality improvement challenges in the healthcare industry and how managers can assess quality of care and implement process improvement measures.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MGT 3210 .
  
  • HCA 4020 - Finance for Healthcare


    Credits: 3
    Students will develop an understanding of administrative financial techniques in healthcare. Students will also analyze the purpose and methods of financial reporting, insurance principles, reimbursement, and laws associated with healthcare finance.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 3080 .
  
  • HCA 4030 - Healthcare Policy and Regulation


    Credits: 3
    Students will examine the development of healthcare policy in the U.S. and the influences of societal, political, and economic environments on the healthcare industry. Students will also analyze the role of both the government’s and regulatory agencies’ influence on the healthcare field.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MGT 3210 .
  
  • HCA 4395 - Healthcare Administration Capstone


    Credits: 3
    This capstone course is the culminating experience for the Bachelor of Applied Science in Healthcare Administration. This capstone course also provides students with the opportunity to integrate and synthesize the knowledge, skills and attitudes acquired throughout their course work in an original comprehensive portfolio. Students will examine the principles of strategic management in relation to healthcare administration and analyze how leadership and professionalism play a role in the successful administration of a healthcare facility.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MGT 3420 .

Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning

  
  • HVAC 1600 - Mechanical Piping Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the different piping materials used for heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration, including polyvinyl chloride (PVC), hard and soft copper, and galvanized and back iron piping. They develop skills to measure, cut, prepare, and connect piping and tubing. In addition, students use a piping schematic to layout a piping system. Finally, students identify and explain the use of common fittings and valves for different styles of piping and tubing.

  
  • HVAC 1610 - Heating and Air Conditioning Principles


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the primary concepts of thermal dynamics and fluid dynamics, including attributes of heat and pressure, states of matter, heat transfer methods, energy conversion, and expressions of power. They gain a fundamental understanding of the refrigeration cycle, system components, and refrigerant properties. Students also explore how the properties of air-to include humidity and temperature-affect human comfort.

  
  • HVAC 1620 - Refrigeration Circuit Components


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the major refrigeration system components, including evaporators, condensers, compressors, metering devices, and accessories. Students apply the internal workings of each different type of component to an operational refrigeration circuit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HVAC 1610 , or instructor approval.
  
  • HVAC 1630 - Energy Efficient Residential Heating Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students explore energy efficient residential gas-fired heating systems. Students install, commission, troubleshoot, and repair residential gas-fired systems of varying efficiencies using electronic test equipment, parts, and tools.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HVAC 1610  or instructor approval with concurrent employment in the field of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning/Refrigeration.
  
  • HVAC 1640 - Automatic Building Controls


    Credits: 3
    Students discover how various types of controls work and how they are applied in heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and refrigeration systems. In particular, they examine bimetallic, liquid-filled, vapor-filled, thermocouple, and thermister controls. In addition, students experiment with the operation of temperature controls, pressure controls, hydronic relief valves, and transducers to include accurate adjustments. Finally, students troubleshoot and repair control systems using electrical test equipment such as voltmeters, ammeters, and ohmmeters.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HVAC 1630  and HVAC 1650 , or instructor approval.
  
  • HVAC 1650 - Residential Air Conditioning Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students leak check, evacuate, recover refrigerant from and charge residential and light commercial air conditioning systems. Students open and seal refrigeration systems using brazing and soldering techniques and also examine Core, Type I, Type II, and Type III system characteristics as they prepare to take the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Refrigerant Handling Certification exams. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HVAC 1610  or instructor approval with concurrent employment in the field of Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning/Refrigeration.
  
  • HVAC 1660 - HVAC Distribution Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the primary concepts of Indoor Air Quality (IAQ). They also investigate the hazards of improper IAQ and methods to mitigate those hazards to include ventilation, humidification, and dehumidification of living spaces. Students examine air distribution systems and use test equipment to measure pressure and flow as part of system balancing.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HVAC 1610  and HVAC 1650 , or instructor approval.
  
  • HVAC 1670 - Light Commercial Refrigeration Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students identify various supermarket refrigeration units for analyzing the selection and installation placement procedures for the equipment. They predict how different refrigerant system installation methods could affect a building’s heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems. In addition, students examine the unique operation quality control aspects of commercial ice production before operating, maintaining, and repairing commercial ice machines. They evaluate and troubleshoot the operation of several styles of commercial refrigeration systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in HVAC 1620 , HVAC 1630 , HVAC 1640 , and HVAC 1660 , or instructor approval.
  
  • HVAC 1710 - Building Automation System Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    Building Automation Systems (BAS) Fundamentals is an introduction to the BAS industry. Students study the history of BAS, identify manufacturers and contractors, and study industry scope and trends as they explore careers in BAS. Students are introduced to types of BAS systems as well as BAS architecture.

  
  • HVAC 1720 - Building Automation Systems Devices


    Credits: 3
    Building Automation Systems (BAS) Devices introduces students to the major types of components found in BAS systems. Students learn how to properly select and apply BAS systems components in the field. Topics include input/output wiring, temperature sensors, humidity sensors, pressure sensors, flow sensors, safety circuits, actuator devices for dampers and control valves, power supplies, transducers, relays, motor controls, power supplies, enclosures and power monitoring devices.

  
  • HVAC 1730 - Building Automation Systems Networking


    Credits: 3
    Building Automation Systems (BAS) Networking introduces the fundamentals of data transmission. The course is closely aligned with Cisco Systems Certification and assists students in their preparation for that credential. Topics covered are network fundamentals, standard, OSI model, IP protocol, network signal transmission, media, protocols, physical topologies, hardware, typical BAS networks and typical BAS subnetworks.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712 .
  
  • HVAC 1740 - Building Automation Systems Logic and Programming


    Credits: 3
    Building Automation Systems (BAS) Logic and Programming introduces concepts and work with logic, truth tables, logical equivalences, conditionals, Boolean expressions, logic gates, digital logic circuits, number systems, object-oriented programming, data types, decision making and programming style.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712  and HVAC 1640 .
  
  • HVAC 1750 - Building Automation Systems Design and Installation


    Credits: 3
    Building Automation Systems (BAS) Design and Installation provides students a hands-on introduction to the fasteners, equipment, tools and methods for installing building automation system components. The concepts and principles of previous BAS courses are applied to the design of and commissioning of automation systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HVAC 1710 .

History

  
  • HIST 1110 - Western Civilization I


    Credits: 3
    Students study and evaluate western civilization from ancient times to the Renaissance. Students study several aspects of this long and complex story, including political, social, military, religious and cultural traditions and their contributions to the modern world.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 .
  
  • HIST 1120 - Western Civilization II


    Credits: 3
    Students study and evaluate western civilization from the Renaissance to modern times. Students study several aspects of this long and complex story, including political, social, military, religious and cultural traditions and their contributions to the modern world.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or placement into ENGL 1010 .
  
  • HIST 1211 - U.S. to 1865


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Society & the Individual - Wyoming Statutory Requirement (HSI)

    Students study a survey of United States history commencing with the America’s prehistory, European background and first discoveries. Students follow the pattern of colonization and the development of American institutions throughout the colonial period and the early national experience to 1865. Students study the essentials of the United States Constitution in context of American history to 1865. Students also evaluate the Wyoming Constitution.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HIST 1221 - U.S. from 1865


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Society & the Individual - Wyoming Statutory Requirement (HSI)

    Students survey U.S. history from the Civil War to the present. This class meets the requirements of the Wyoming statutes providing for instruction in the provisions and principles of the constitutions of the U.S. and of Wyoming.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HIST 1251 - Wyoming History


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Society & the Individual - Wyoming Statutory Requirement (HSI)

    Students study Wyoming’s economic, political, constitutional, and social history from preterritorial days to the present. Students analyze the constitutions of the United States and Wyoming.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HIST 1290 - History of the U.S. West


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introductory survey of the American West, wherein students examine developments in both the 19th and 20th centuries beginning in the nineteenth century from early exploration through the fur trade, including territorial expansion to the Pacific and in the American Southwest. Students also develop an informed familiarity with western American mining frontiers, the growth and expansion of the cattle industry and farming frontiers, and examine the diversity of the people living in this region.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 , or placement into ENGL 1010 .
  
  • HIST 1341 - World History to 1500


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the history of the world’s peoples and societies from human prehistory to 1500, with an emphasis on the diversity and interconnectedness of human life in the past.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HIST 1351 - World History Since 1500


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the history of the world’s peoples and societies from 1500 to the present, with an emphasis on the diversity and interconnectedness of human life in the past.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HIST 2120 - Ancient Greece and the Near East


    Credits: 3
    A survey of ancient western history from its beginnings in Mesopotamia to the coming of Rome. Students examine several aspects of this long and complex story: political, social, military, religious, and cultural traditions and their contributions to the modern world. The Trojan War, Sparta, the Persian Wars, Alexander the Great, and Greek mythology will be given special attention.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • HIST 2290 - History of North American Indians


    Credits: 3
    Students survey North American Indian history from the time of Columbus through present time. Students analyze and evaluate how political, social and economic change impacted the Indian people.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or placement into ENGL 1010 .
  
  • HIST 2390 - Mexican Civilization


    Credits: 3
    A historical and cultural survey of Mexico to include the study of pre-Hispanic civilizations, the Spanish Conquest, the independence movement, the Mexican Revolution, and the modern era. Students gain an appreciation of the development of Mexican culture through its history and artistic thought and the influence that Mexico has had upon the United States. Cross-listed with HUMN 2395 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.

Home Economics

  
  • HOEC 1140 - Nutrition


    Credits: 2
    A study of basic principles of normal nutrition, their application in food selection, and current issues in nutrition and weight maintenance. Students analyze diets and eating patterns to improve nutritional status and evaluate nutritional claims of products. Students apply nutrition principles to individuals throughout the lifespan and on selected special diets.


Hospitality & Restaurant Management

  
  • HRM 1505 - Sanitation


    Credits: 3
    Students learn and practice the fundamentals of high-quality sanitation practices for food service employees, focusing on practical guidance in safe food handling from a scientific perspective. Students also learn sanitation concepts from an economic, legal, and moral point of view.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • HRM 1515 - Planning & Control for Food and Beverage Operations


    Credits: 3
    Students learn and practice essential procedures for effective food and beverage planning and cost control. Using appropriate software to calculate food, beverage, and labor costs, students develop an effective sales income control system. Students also learn principles of food production and service management, including menu planning, purchasing, and storage.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HRM 1505 , CULA 1515 , CULA 1600 , and CULA 2700 .

Human Development

  
  • HMDV 1510 - Success in the Workplace: Soft Skills


    Credits: 3
    Students identify and develop the soft skills necessary for success in the workplace; explore workplace etiquette requirements; and develop strategies on how to market skills to potential employers in the global job market.


Human Services

  
  • HMSV 1005 - Group Process


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to the dynamics of group interaction with emphasis upon the student’s firsthand experience as a group leader and member. The factors involved in problems of communication, effective emotional responses and personal growth will be highlighted. Emphasis will be placed on group process as a means of changing behavior. This course is designed to assist human services students who will function as group leaders and co-leaders.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HMSV 1010 - Orientation to Human Services


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the field of human services as a profession and the historical and philosophical framework of service delivery. Contemporary roles of the human service worker will be covered including areas such as typical duties and tasks of human service workers, working with a diverse array of client issues, intervention strategies and the sociocultural aspects of providing services in a multicultural diverse society. Students also examine the competencies and qualifications required to become an effective human service worker.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HMSV 1060 - Case Management for Human Services


    Credits: 3
    An introductory course focusing on observation, evaluation and record keeping in the human services field. Successful students demonstrate observation skills, analyze behavioral scales and checklists, and develop informal assessment tools. Students discuss objectivity in assessment, evaluation and documentation.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HMSV 1010  or permission of instructor.
  
  • HMSV 1110 - Ethics for Helping Professions


    Credits: 3
    Students explore an overview of the ethical and professional issues that Human Services workers face in the field. Included are such topics as ethical decision making, professional responsibilities, liability, confidentiality, records and rights of clients, professional code of ethics, core values and personal issues, supervision, leadership and working with the legal system.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HMSV 1460 - Field Experience in Human Services I


    Credits: 3
    Students gain knowledge and experience in the Human Services field by participating in on-the-job training. This 90 hour field experience is scheduled, structured and supervised by a state and/or nationally certified or licensed professional. In addition to the field experience, students meet for a weekly seminar with their instructor. Students perform relevant job duties and tasks within their community agency, attend supervision meetings, identify community resources that are applicable, and perform other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HMSV 1010 , HMSV 1060 , HMSV 1110  and CNSL 2300 .
  
  • HMSV 2030 - Behavioral Health and Wellness


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the dimensions of wellness including the physical, emotional, social and spiritual components. Strategies for personal behavioral health and wellness including coping strategies, personal boundaries, self-awareness and how to avoid burnout on the job are practiced during the course of the class.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HMSV 2110 - Field Experience in Human Services II


    Credits: 4
    This is the second field experience course in the Human Services program. Students gain practical knowledge and experience in the Human Services field by participating in on-the-job training. This 120 hour field experience is scheduled, structured, and supervised by a state and/or nationally certified or licenses professional. In addition to the field experience, students meet for a weekly seminar with the instructor. Students perform relevant job duties and tasks within their community agency, attend supervision meetings, identify community resources that are applicable, and perform other job duties as assigned. Instructor permission is required for site choice.


Humanities

  
  • HUMN 1010 - Introductory Humanities I


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    In Introductory Humanities I, students explore visual and performing arts, architecture, literature, music, philosophy and religions in their historical and social contexts from prehistory through the Middle Ages.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HUMN 1020 - Introductory Humanities II


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    In Introductory Humanities II, students explore visual and performing arts, architecture, literature, music, philosophy and religions in their historical and social contexts from the Renaissance into postmodernism.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • HUMN 2395 - Mexican Civilization


    Credits: 3
    This is a historical and cultural survey of Mexico to include the study of pre-Hispanic civilizations, the Spanish conquest, the independence movement, the Mexican Revolution, and the modern era. Students gain an appreciation of the development of Mexican culture through its history and artistic thought and the influence that Mexico has had upon the United States. Cross-listed with HIST 2390 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.

Information Management

  
  • IMGT 2400 - Intro to Information Management


    Credits: 3
    This course is concerned with the role of information systems in managing organizations to make them more competitive and efficient. Specific topics include organizational and technical foundation of informational systems and building and managing systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2020  or CMAP 1200 .
  
  • IMGT 3020 - Information Management and Security


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the role of information systems in managing organizations to make them more competitive and efficient. Students also examine methods and security issues related to managing information and information flows of organizations. Additionally, students analyze practices for communicating secure information to internal and external stakeholders in a professional setting. Students will utliize industry-standard information management tools.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MGT 3210 .

Integrated Systems Technology

  
  • IST 1520 - Intro to Industrial Safety


    Credits: 3
    Students identify sources of and describe safety rules, regulations and practices related to job site hazards, personal protective equipment, hazard communication and electrical safety. Students will demonstrate the ability to solve problems related to rigging loads and proper forklift operations. Students earn an OSHA 10 General Industry card upon completion.

  
  • IST 1560 - Trade Skills Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    Students add, subtract, multiply, divide, and convert decimals, percentages, and fractions; students also solve for unknown quantities with a focus on how they can use these mathematical principles and operations in an industrial setting. Students identify, explain and demonstrate the safe handling and use of industrial hand and power tools. Students identify and explain the types of plans, prints, drawings, and specifications designed for industrial equipment and facilities.

  
  • IST 1610 - Fluid Power


    Credits: 1
    Students identify, explain, describe and predict changes to hydraulic and pneumatic systems. Students increase their knowledge of the basic components found in industrial fluid powered systems. Students must enroll concurrently in IST 1611  to apply the topics of this course in a hands-on environment.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1611 .
  
  • IST 1611 - Fluid Power Circuits


    Credits: 1
    Students gain knowledge and demonstrate the safe use of fluid-powered components, the assembly of fluid-powered systems, the measurement of system characteristics, and the creation of system prints. Students apply knowledge to evaluate the components of a fluid-powered system for any required maintenance. All course exercises are performed in a lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1610 .
  
  • IST 1660 - Mechanical Drives


    Credits: 1
    Students identify and explain the safety rules, regulations, test procedures, installation, removal and operation of mechanical couplings, shafts and bearings. Students must enroll concurrently in IST 1661  to apply the topics of this course in a hands-on environment.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1661 .
  
  • IST 1661 - Mechanical Drive Assemblies


    Credits: 1
    Students learn to apply mechanical theories while safely installing belt drives, chain drives, gears, couplings, and bearings. Students apply knowledge to evaluate if any of the mechanical components of drive assemblies require maintenance. All course exercises are performed in a lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1660 .
  
  • IST 1710 - DC Electricity


    Credits: 2
    Students identify and explain electrical safety rules, concepts, and operating characteristics of direct current (DC) electrical circuits. Students also identify the operation and use of common electrical test equipment. Students must concurrently enroll in IST 1711  to apply the topics of this course in a hands-on environment.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1711 .
  
  • IST 1711 - DC Electrical Circuits


    Credits: 1
    Students gain knowledge and produce circuit measurements for circuit calculation and assembly while maintaining electrical safety. Students develop knowledge about direct current electrical circuit concepts and apply this knowledge to evaluate the components of the direct current electrical circuits for any required maintenance. All course exercises are performed in a lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1710 .
  
  • IST 1712 - AC Electricity


    Credits: 2
    Students identify and explain electrical safety rules, concepts, and operating characteristics of alternating current (AC) electrical circuits. Students also identify the operation and use of common electrical test equipment. Students must concurrently enroll in IST 1713  to apply the topics of this course in a hands-on environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1710  and IST 1711 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1713 .
  
  • IST 1713 - AC Electrical Circuits


    Credits: 1
    Students gain knowledge and interpret circuit measurements for circuit calculation and assembly while maintaining electrical safety. Students develop knowledge about Alternating Current (AC) electrical circuit concepts and apply this knowledge to evaluate the components of the AC electrical circuits for required maintenance. All course exercises are performed in a lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1712 .
  
  • IST 1770 - Motor Controls


    Credits: 2
    Students identify and explain safety rules, concepts, and operating characteristics of electric motor controls. Students must concurrently enroll in IST 1771  to apply the topics of this course in a hands-on environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1771 .
  
  • IST 1771 - Motor Control Circuits


    Credits: 1
    Students practice mechanical and electrical system safety, build motor control circuits, and measure the operating characteristics of those motor control circuits. Students must have a thorough understanding of the knowledge related to these skills before attempting any maintenance actions. Students complete all course outcomes in a lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712 , and completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1770 .
  
  • IST 1780 - Electric Motors


    Credits: 2
    Students learn to identify safety procedures, regulations, and operating characteristics of Direct Current (DC) and Alternating Current (AC) motors. Students identify and predict how environmental changes affect motor operations. Course exercises are a combination of self-paced online materials and classroom activities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1781 .
  
  • IST 1781 - Electric Motor Circuits


    Credits: 1
    Students configure, install, and operate direct current and alternating current motors. Students also select, inspect, use, and maintain electrical test equipment. Students must have a thorough understanding of the knowledge related to these skills before attempting to perform any maintenance actions. Students complete all course outcomes in an industrial maintenance laboratory environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712 , and completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1780 .
  
  • IST 1810 - Programmable Logic Controllers


    Credits: 2
    Students explore the hardware and software used to control automated industrial equipment. Students identify, classify and predict the operational characteristics of fixed and modular programmable logic controllers. Students must concurrently enroll in IST 1811  to apply the topics of this course in a hands-on environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1710  and IST 1712 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in IST 1811 .
  
  • IST 1811 - PLC Circuits I


    Credits: 1
    Students learn to assemble, program, and operate Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs) and develop knowledge of PLC industrial system components. Students learn to identify PLCs hardware and software interface for input and output of system components. Students construct computer programs to control system operation. Students apply this knowledge to evaluate the components of the PLC for any required maintenance. All course exercises are performed in a lab environment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in IST 1810 .

Kinesiology

  
  • KIN 1006 - Fitness Component: Flexibility


    Credits: 2
    Students examine the multiple facets that comprise the fitness component of flexibility. Students develop knowledge of the health benefits of flexibility, assess flexibility, design flexibility programs, and demonstrate multiple methods of flexibility including static, dynamic, active isolated stretching, myofascial release, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF).

  
  • KIN 1007 - Fitness Component: Cardiovascular Endurance


    Credits: 2
    Students examine the multiple facets that comprise the fitness component of cardiovascular endurance. Students develop an understanding of the heart and lungs and the role exercise and physical activity play in either improving or maintaining this critical body system. Students explore the energy systems, recovery, target heart rate, training zone, and perceived rate of exertion as elements of this fitness component. Students evaluate and design cardiovascular endurance programs.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PEAC 1295 .
  
  • KIN 1008 - Fitness Component: Muscular Strength/Muscular Endurance


    Credits: 2
    Students examine the fitness component of muscular strength/endurance. Students demonstrate multi-joint pushing, pulling, and lower body exercises. Students explore the pros/cons of resistance training tools, including but not limited to barbells, dumbbells, kettlebells, medicine balls, body weight exercises, and weight machines. Students distinguish the differences between muscular strength and muscular endurance and the unique role each one plays in a comprehensive fitness program.

  
  • KIN 1010 - Introduction to Sport Management


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the historical development, current trends, best practices, and future trends of sport management. Foundational principles will be taught within the framework of professional, collegiate, interscholastic, non-traditional, and youth and community sport in select subject areas including: the history of sport management and current curriculum, careers in sport management, marketing, ethics, finance, law, management, communications, facility design and management, and sociology.

  
  • KIN 1100 - Kinesiology, the Science of Human Movement


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the science of human movement and its many associated professional sub-disciplines including biomechanics, motor control/learning/development, injury prevention, community and public health, teaching physical and health education, exercise physiology, sport and exercise psychology, sport sociology, and athletic training. Students explore the various professional and educational requirements associated with each field and participate in job shadows to gain a better understanding of professionalism in selected fields of study.

  
  • KIN 1212 - Intro to Exercise Programming


    Credits: 1
    Students apply the standards and accepted practices for recommending physical fitness/exercise programs to apparently healthy individuals based on fitness levels as determined through a variety of assessments. In addition, students investigate the relationship between an active lifestyle and health.

  
  • KIN 2000 - History and Philosophy of Sport


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the breadth, scope, and nature of the sport profession. Students discuss the history and philosophy of sport and the factors that influence its evolution. Special consideration is given to the history of sport from antiquity to the present, particularly the Olympic Games.

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 1010 .
  
  • KIN 2135 - Personal Trainer Education I


    Credits: 3
    This is the first of a two course sequence. Students are introduced to the principles and techniques of personal training. Students learn concepts of applied kinesiology, exercise physiology, client communication and relationship building, behavior change psychology, and client assessment approaches. Students learn to properly screen clients for safe participation in an exercise program, utilize different tools for assessing a client’s fitness level, and identify appropriate assessment techniques for a wide variety of clientele. Students learn components of program design for resistance, cardiorespiratory, comprehensive, and personal training sessions. This course has a lecture component and a laboratory component.

    Prerequisite: Recommended completion of KIN 1212 .
  
  • KIN 2137 - Personal Trainer Education II


    Credits: 3
    This course is the second of a two-part sequence and follows KIN 2135 Personal Trainer Education I. This course bridges the gap between exercise science-related coursework and the practical application skills for personal training. Students learn resistance training techniques and principles, functional programming approaches, cardiorespiratory training strategies, mind-body exercise, exercises for special populations, injury prevention, and personal training business fundamentals. Following the completion of this two-part sequence, students are prepared to sit for the American Council on Exercise Certified Personal Training Exam. This course has a lecture component and a laboratory component. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 2135 .
  
  • KIN 2200 - Recreation and Leisure in Modern Society


    Credits: 2
    Students examine the meaning, problems, and scope of the recreation and leisure industry. The students evaluate the history, philosophy, and principles of recreation and explore the agencies providing recreation programs. Students also investigate facility and personnel development, management, and programming for recreation and leisure activities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 1010 .
  
  • KIN 2450 - Exercise Science Internship


    Credits: 1
    Students have the opportunity to apply their knowledge from the Exercise Science program coursework in a professional environment. Students select a subdiscipline of Exercise Science, such as Physical Therapy, and participate in 30 hours of internship experience.

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 2470 
    Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in KIN 2471 .
  
  • KIN 2470 - Exercise Science Practicum I


    Credits: 1
    Students work in conjunction with Exercise Science instructors to provide individual planning and programming for a variety of populations. Students also observe professionals in Exercise Science related fields in a variety of settings. This is the first of a two practicum sequence.

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 2135 .
  
  • KIN 2471 - Exercise Science Practicum II


    Credits: 2
    Students work in conjunction with Exercise Science instructors to provide individual exercise planning and programming for a variety of populations. Students also observe professionals in Exercise Science related fields. This is the second of a two practicum sequence. For successful completion of the program, students must complete the course with a C or higher.

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 2470  and concurrent enrollment in KIN 2450 .
  
  • KIN 2490 - History and Philosophy of Sport


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the breadth, scope, and nature of the sport profession. Students discuss the history and philosophy of sport and the factors that influence its evolution. Special consideration is given to the history of sport from antiquity to the present, particularly the Olympic Games.

    Prerequisite: Completion of KIN 1010 .

Management

  
  • MGT 1000 - Introduction to Supervision


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire techniques to improve or establish themselves as first-line supervisors. The student will understand and be able to apply basic management principles in solving problems encountered by first-line supervisors.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
 

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