LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 
    
    May 28, 2024  
LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prerequisites

A prerequisite is designed to help students be successful. Prerequisites also inform prospective students what body of knowledge is necessary to be successful in a particular course.

If a prerequisite course is listed for a subsequent course, the student must have completed satisfactorily (grade of C or better) the prerequisite course, scored at an equivalent level of placement using with high school GPA or ACT, or completed an equivalent course at a college/university that holds institutional accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Equivalent courses must be demonstrated by submitting an official transcript, and final determination will be made by the Office of the Registrar. For additional information, please refer to the “Academic Skills Assessment and Placement Policy ”.

The college has designated English and math prerequisite skill levels for many of the courses in the curriculum. The table below equates placement test levels with a specific developmental course.

This sample course description identifies how to determine the prerequisites for a given course.

PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


Credits: 4
General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.

Students registering for PHYS 1050 must have completed successfully:

 

Electrical Technology

  
  • ELTR 1611 - Electrical Calculations


    Credits: 3
    Students explain how to calculate branch circuit and feeder loads for residential and commercial applications. Considering component installation and the National Electric Code requirements, basic service calculations for commercial and residential applications are practiced.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1520 .
  
  • ELTR 1621 - Electrical Conductors and Cables


    Credits: 3
    Students investigate the factors involved in conductor selection, including insulation types, current-carrying capacity, temperature ratings, and voltage drop. Students describe methods of terminating and splicing conductors, including preparing and taping conductors. Students focus on the purpose of grounding and bonding electrical systems covered in the National Electric Code.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1560 .
  
  • ELTR 1631 - Electrical Wiring Methods


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to systems, mounting hardware and applications of raceways, wireways, ducts, pull and junction boxes. Students demonstrate the selection and sizing of pull boxes and junction boxes and the applications of proper wiring techniques according to the National Electric Code requirements.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HMDV 1510 .
  
  • ELTR 1641 - Special Location Wiring Methods


    Credits: 3
    Students investigate the installation of electric circuits in health care facilities, including the requirements for life safety and critical circuits. Students investigate a basic overview of HVAC systems and their controls, electrical troubleshooting and the related National Electric Code requirements.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1660  and IST 1661 .

Emergency Medical Services-Paramedics

  
  • EMGT 2500 - Paramedic Preparatory


    Credits: 2
    A study of comprehensive concepts that prepare an EMT for national and state paramedic certification. Students analyze EMS systems, paramedic roles and respon­sibilities, paramedic well-being, illness/injury prevention, medical/legal issues, and healthcare ethics.

    Prerequisite: Completion of entrance exam and instructor approval.
  
  • EMGT 2515 - Paramedic Anatomy and Physiology


    Credits: 3
    Students explore fundamental anatomy and physiology concepts related to paramedic practice. Students integrate a complex depth and comprehensive breadth of knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of all human systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of entrance exam and instructor approval.
  
  • EMGT 2525 - Paramedic Pharmacology


    Credits: 2
    Students explore fundamental pharmacology concepts related to paramedic practice. Students integrate a complex depth and comprehensive breadth of knowledge of pharmacology and the human body.

    Prerequisite: Completion of entrance exam and instructor approval.
  
  • EMGT 2535 - Paramedic Airway


    Credits: 2
    Students integrate a complex knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology into an airway assessment and airway procedures. Students develop a treatment plan with the goal of assuring a patent airway, adequate ventilation, and respiration for patients of all ages.

    Prerequisite: Completion of entrance exam and instructor approval.
  
  • EMGT 2545 - Paramedic Advanced Cardiac Life Support


    Credits: 4
    Students investigate complex knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and pathophysiology into a cardiovascular assessment and perform basic and advanced ECG interpretation and electrical therapy procedures. Students develop a treatment plan for patients with cardiovascular disease and ECG abnormalities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of entrance exam and instructor consent.
  
  • EMGT 2555 - Paramedic Advanced Medical Life Support


    Credits: 3
    Students integrate assessment findings with principles of epidemiology and pathophysiology to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for a patient with a medical complaint.

    Prerequisite: Completion of entrance exam and instructor consent.
  
  • EMGT 2565 - Paramedic Pre-hospital Trauma Life Support


    Credits: 2
    Students integrate assessment findings with principles of epidemiology and pathophysiology to formulate a field impression to implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for an acutely injured patient.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2555 .
  
  • EMGT 2575 - Paramedic Special Populations and Operations


    Credits: 3
    Students integrate assessment findings with principles of pathophysiology and knowledge of psychosocial needs to formulate a field impression and implement a comprehensive treatment/disposition plan for patients with special needs. Students also gain knowledge of operational roles and responsibilities to ensure safety for the patient, the public and themselves.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2555 .
  
  • EMGT 2600 - Paramedic Clinical I


    Credits: 1
    Students are provided a clinical experience in the hospital setting under the supervision of a preceptor. In the clinical setting students, gain experience with patient assessments and various allowed skills. Students will demonstrate competency in patient care and assessment, assist the preceptor or other medical staff, work with a preceptor to apply knowledge in the vehicular setting, apply knowledge of patient pathophysiology, and formulate treatment plans. These correlate to the paramedic’s scope of practice, and use of effective communication to patients and staff in explaining their knowledge of patient care. Students complete 48 hours of clinical experience for this course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2545 .
  
  • EMGT 2605 - Paramedic Clinical II


    Credits: 4
    Students are provided a clinical experience in the hospital setting under the supervision of a preceptor.  In the clinical setting students, gain experience with patient assessments and various allowed skills.  Students will demonstrate competency in patient care and assessment, assist the preceptor or other medical staff, work with a preceptor to apply knowledge in the vehicular setting, apply knowledge of patient pathophysiology, and formulate treatment plans.  These correlate to the paramedic’s scope of practice, and use of effective communication to patients and staff in explaining their knowledge of patient care. Students complete the remaining 192 hours of clinical experience in this course. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2600 .
  
  • EMGT 2620 - Paramedic Vehicular I


    Credits: 3
    Students perform 135 hours of vehicular time at various Emergency Medical Services (EMS) agencies throughout the region while completing course competencies and gaining valuable experience performing patient assessments and other applicable skills as appropriate for the specific patient situation. At the completion of this course, students are prepared to function autonomously at or above the Green Level as described in the Paramedic handbook. The EMS program is a closed Program.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2600  and EMGT 2605  .
  
  • EMGT 2630 - Paramedic Vehicular II


    Credits: 10
    Students complete the final 380 hours of required vehicular time at various EMS and fire agencies throughout the region while completing course competencies and gaining valuable experience through performing patient assessments and various applicable skills. Students participate in review lectures and case review/patient care report reviews during this course. At the completion of this course, students will function within the Red Level; autonomously at the level of an entry level paramedic, as described in the Paramedic handbook. The EMS program is a closed Program.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2620 .
  
  • EMGT 2700 - Paramedic Capstone


    Credits: 3
    Students prepare for the State and National Registry Examinations. Students practice final skills, review for the examinations, and organize their vehicular/clinical documentation for course completion.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EMGT 2600 .

Emergency Medical Technology

  
  • EMT 1500 - Basic Emergency Medical Technician


    Credits: 9
    Students prepare to identify medical and trauma emergencies and are able to provide appropriate interventions in this entry-level course. Students learn proper medical care for emergencies such as stroke, heart attack, drug overdoses, childbirth as well as traumatic events such as car accidents, burns, and other emergency situations, At the conclusion of the course students take the Wyoming Licensure exam to become licensed EMTs. Students are eligible to take the National Registry of EMT’s exam. This entry-level training enables students to seek employment in the field of pre-hospital emergency medicine as paid or volunteer providers and provides an important professional link into other allied health professions.


Engineering Science

  
  • ES 1060 - Intro to Engineering Problem Solving


    Credits: 3
    In this course, students explore spreadsheets and structured programming. Students apply the methodology used in the engineering profession for analyzing problems. In laboratory, students solve example problems using appropriate computer software.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400 .
  
  • ES 2110 - Statics


    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the statics of particles and rigid bodies and to the analysis of structures. Students apply equilibrium conditions to physical systems (including particles, rigid bodies, trusses, frames, and machines) using free body diagrams and vector analysis.

    Corequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2205 .
  
  • ES 2120 - Dynamics


    Credits: 3
    A study of the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. Students apply laws of motion to analyze the dynamics of particles and rigid bodies, including momentum and energy considerations.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ES 2110  and MATH 2205 .
  
  • ES 2210 - Electric Circuit Analysis


    Credits: 4
    A study of electric circuits and their theoretical base. Students apply theoretical tools such as network theorems and phasors to analyze electric circuits, including dependent sources, first and second order circuits, and three-phase power systems. The accompanying laboratory reinforces electric circuit principles.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 2205 .
  
  • ES 2310 - Thermodynamics I


    Credits: 4
    A study of the thermodynamics of macroscopic systems. Students learn about energy and its various forms, state variables and equations of state, pure substances and property tables, reversible and irreversible processes. Students also apply laws of thermodynamics to analyze power, heat pump, and refrigeration cycles.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ES 2120  and MATH 2210 , or PHYS 1310 .
  
  • ES 2330 - Fluid Dynamics


    Credits: 3
    A study of the incompressible flow of ideal and real fluids. Students learn about fundamental concepts such as potential functions, stream functions, and dimensional analysis. Students also apply equations of fluid dynamics to solve fluid flow problems such as flow in pipes and open channels.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ES 2120 , MATH 2210 , and ES 2120  or PHYS 1310 .
  
  • ES 2410 - Mechanics of Materials


    Credits: 3
    A study of stresses inside deformable bodies. Students apply statics as well as new techniques such as Mohr’s circle to perform stress analysis of deformable bodies.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ES 2110  and MATH 2205 .

English

  
  • ENGL 0810 - Fundamentals of Reading and Writing


    Credits: 6
    Students practice critical reading and academic writing as a process and develop interrelated literacy skills to improve their success in college-level courses.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate placement.
  
  • ENGL 0910 - Literacy Enhancement for Composition I


    Credits: 3
    Students practice research, reading, and writing as a process in order to develop literacy skills for success in college-level courses. Students must be co-enrolled in the Composition I course.

    Prerequisite: Appropriate ACT placement score or successful completion of ENGL 0810 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 .
  
  • ENGL 1010 - English Composition I


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Written Communication (WC)

    In this composition course, students conduct college-level research; apply critical reading and analysis strategies; and draft, revise, and edit a variety of academic and professional essays. Students will develop awareness of audience, purpose, and genre; generate logically organized claims with evidence; and use appropriate formatting, including MLA.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • ENGL 1020 - English Composition II


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Written Communication (WC)

    Students independently gather material from primary and secondary research; critically read and analyze material; synthesize information; write expository essays in a variety of academic genres; and document sources according to appropriate styles.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • ENGL 1040 - Intro to Creative Writing


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    This course is intended for non-English majors and serves to guide students’ understanding of the creative process and its relevance to their own interests and goals. Students learn introductory craft, analysis, and revision skills as they relate to creative writing. Students read a variety of literary genres from different societal, cultural, and historical contexts; analyze and reflect on their own craft choices; and produce multiple drafts of creative writing in multiple genres.

  
  • ENGL 2040 - Creative Writing


    Credits: 3
    This course is intended for students on the Communication and Creative Arts (CCA) Pathway and serves to guide their understanding of the creative process, literature and analysis, and potential education and career paths. Students learn introductory craft, analysis, revision, and communication skills as they relate to creative writing. Students read a variety of literary genres from different societal, cultural, and historical contexts; participate in workshop critique and discussion; analyze and reflect on their own and others’ craft choices; and produce multiple drafts of creative writing in multiple genres.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010  or instructor consent.
  
  • ENGL 2050 - Creative Writing: Fiction


    Credits: 3
    Students learn introductory craft, analysis, revision, and communication skills as they relate to writing fiction. Students read a variety of fiction from different societal, cultural, and historical contexts; participate in workshop critique and discussion; analyze and reflect on their own and others’ craft choices; and create multiple drafts of fiction. May be repeated for up to two times for credit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1040  or ENGL 2040  or instructor approval.
  
  • ENGL 2060 - Creative Writing: Non-Fiction


    Credits: 3
    Students read a variety of creative nonfiction from different societal, cultural, and historical contexts; participate in workshop critique and discussion; analyze and reflect on their own and others’ craft choices; and create multiple drafts of creative nonfiction.  More specifically, students research, organize, and express themselves in a nonfiction genre, such as essay, memoir, article, biography, autobiography, etc.  May be repeated for up to two times for credit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1040  or ENGL 2040  or instructor approval.
  
  • ENGL 2080 - Creative Writing: Poetry


    Credits: 3
    Students learn introductory craft, analysis, revision, and communication skills as they relate to writing poetry. Students read a variety of poetry from different societal, cultural, and historical contexts; participate in workshop critique and discussion; analyze and reflect on their own and others’ craft choices; and create multiple drafts of poetry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1040  or  ENGL 2040  or instructor approval.
  
  • ENGL 2095 - Writing Your Life


    Credits: 3
    In this scholarly course, students write memoirs about the stories that have shaped their lives. Students read an array of published creative nonfiction in the form of personal essay and memoir, referring to them in discussion of how personal stories teach us profound lessons about ourselves, others, and our world. Students use the writing process in development of their memoirs and are expected to participate in writing workshops that include both written and verbal/discussion-based feedback. May be repeated for up to two times for credit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 2040 .
  
  • ENGL 2100 - Literary Magazine


    Credits: 1-3
    Students prepare to assume the responsibility of publishing a literary/arts magazine once a year. Students fulfill responsibilities in a variety of areas: recruitment, publicity, marketing, fundraising, sales, submission selection process, desktop publishing, magazine layout, and other editorial duties. May be repeated for up to 6 credits.

    Prerequisite: Approval of instructor.
  
  • ENGL 2140 - World Literature


    Credits: 3
    Students study a survey of significant works of seminal literature spanning a spectrum of genres, time periods, histories, and cultures. Literature works will span from the works of ancient cultures and continue through present day. Students analyze texts through discussions and formal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • ENGL 2205 - Intro to Literature


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    Students critically read a variety of literary works that possess distinct class, race, culture, gender, genre, and time-period origination. Students employ literary terminology and literary concepts to analyze these works’ external, structural, and social influences. Students develop understanding through discussion and select writing assignments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 .
  
  • ENGL 2210 - English Literature


    Credits: 3
    Students survey the major authors and literary movements in English literature beginning with the Middle Ages and continuing through the Restoration.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2220 - English Literature: The Romantic Period to the Present


    Credits: 3
    Students survey the major authors and literary movements in English literature beginning with the Romantic Period and continuing through the present day.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2230 - Introduction to Shakespeare


    Credits: 3
    Students examine Shakespeare’s writings, including selections from his histories, comedies, tragedies and romances, as well as his poetry. Alongside close readings of his texts, students explore contexts of Shakespeare’s plays and poetry, both those contemporary to Shakespeare and those contemporary to the modern world, in order to address the lasting nature of his work.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2270 - Modern Women Writers


    Credits: 3
    A literature course emphasizing writing by women from 1899 to present day. Students recognize and critique texts written by women of diverse identities and ethnicities in a variety of literary genres and forms. Students examine themes of gender, ethnicity, class, marginalization, and agency in course texts. Students demonstrate basic vocabulary of literary criticism, particularly feminist criticism. Students write literary analysis essays and conduct scholarly research on issues connected to women in modern society.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2310 - American Literature I


    Credits: 3
    Students survey the major figures and literary movements in the United States beginning with the pre-colonial period and continuing through the Civil War. Students gain an understanding of the historical, political, philosophical, and religious influences upon early American literature.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2320 - American Literature II


    Credits: 3
    Students survey the major figures and literary movements in the United States from the Civil War to present, including naturalism, realism, modernism, and post-modernism eras. Students gain an understanding of the historical, political, philosophical, and religious influences upon later American literature.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2330 - Contemporary and Multicultural Literature


    Credits: 3
    This course investigates post-World War II literature in English, including fiction, poetry, and essays by ethnic writers. Students examine the “American Dream” as relevant to contemporary American life through discussion of such issues as pluralism, discrimination, class, and cultural conflict, and gender issues.

    Corequisite: ENGL 2205 .
  
  • ENGL 2340 - Native American Culture and Literature


    Credits: 3
    Students engage in a broad cultural study of Native Americans, past and present. The course examines and engages in critical evaluation of the social and historical contexts surrounding Native America through selected biographies, novels, short stories, poetry and/or drama. Students address the way Native American identity grows out of the borderland between oral and written traditions and western and Native American culture.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • ENGL 2411 - Literary Genres: Graphic Novels


    Credits: 3
    Students study the literary and aesthetic features of graphic novels. Students read an array of graphic novels that explore various thematic, cultural, genre, and philosophical issues. Students analyze texts through discussions and formal writing assignments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • ENGL 2420 - Literary Genres:


    Credits: 3
    Students study specific genres of literature (e.g. Gay and Lesbian Literature, Young Adult Literature). Emphasis will vary from semester to semester, depending on curricular needs. May be repeated for up to three times for credit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .

Entrepreneurship

  
  • ENTR 1500 - Intro to Entrepreneurship


    Credits: 3
    An introductory course that explores the small business climate, the identification of entrepreneurial traits, and the feasibility of a business opportunity. Students analyze and determine how to obtain the skills needed to own, operate, and manage a small business successfully. Students determine the market and industry research necessary to define the scope of a business opportunity.

  
  • ENTR 1520 - Creating a Business Plan


    Credits: 3
    Students evaluate a business opportunity, collect and organize research data into a marketing plan, and prepare a financial plan for their small business idea. In addition, students gain skills to be able to continue developing their business plan as they learn new information and gain ability to make a “go” or “no-go” determination.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENTR 1500 .
  
  • ENTR 2550 - Social and Internet Technologies


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the current social and Internet mediums as they relate to business in today’s world. Students examine venues including quickly changing online technologies and mobile mediums. Students analyze the issues with which marketers wrestle today as they navigate the new tools and challenges including blogs, social networking, user-generated content, and video as well as others.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENTR 1500 .
  
  • ENTR 2700 - Entrepreneurial Mindset


    Credits: 3
    Students develop entrepreneurial mindsets as they explore concepts essential to success in startups or within established firms. Students emphasize creativity and innovation as they experience the process of identifying and evaluating ideas and developing them into business opportunities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .

Equine Studies

  
  • EQST 1505 - Basic Horsemanship


    Credits: 4
    Designed for students who desire training in horsemanship skills and horse care. Students acquire knowledge and valuable skills in horsemanship needed to improve balance, the proper use of aids such as hands, weight, legs, and voice, and appropriate cues at all three gaits.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent required.
  
  • EQST 1515 - Equine Science I


    Credits: 4
    Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts in Equine Science. Students acquire an understanding of history, breed characteristics, selection, skeletal anatomy, dentistry and basic hoof care of horses. Foundation knowledge of equine husbandry and care is applied to an industry setting with the use of hands-on laboratories.

  
  • EQST 1605 - Equine Facilities Management


    Credits: 2
    This course is designed to educate students in safe and effective equine facilities management. Students will explore equine facility design, record keeping, employee management, and conflict resolution. Areas of evaluation are safety, horse handling, horse husbandry, facility management, and professionalism. Students will have the opportunity to test for certification by the Certified Horsemanship Association (CHA) in Equine Facility Management (EFM).  

  
  • EQST 1685 - Equine Behavior and Horsemanship


    Credits: 4
    Students evaluate a horse’s body language, identify how a horse learns, common stereotypic behaviors and key factors for the foundation of training. Students acquire knowledge and valuable skills in horsemanship needed to improve balance, the proper use of aids such as hands, weight, legs and voice, and appropriate cues at all three gaits. Basic training techniques will also be applied throughout the course.

  
  • EQST 1720 - Basic Roping


    Credits: 2
    This basic course is designed to help students acquire proper calf roping, heading, and heeling techniques. Students learn to use the appropriate type of rope and the proper basic rope swing for each event. Students demonstrate mental and physical preparation and proper equipment use. At the end of the course, students demonstrate technique improvement.

  
  • EQST 2500 - Equine Health Management


    Credits: 3
    Students explore equine health management principles and practices, including a practical examination of equine nutrition, diseases, and vaccines. Students learn to identify lameness and differentiate between various types of lameness. Students also discuss general safety and first aid techniques.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EQST 2516 .
  
  • EQST 2516 - Equine Science II


    Credits: 3
    A continuation of EQST 1515  with emphasis on the internal anatomy and physiology of the horse. Students acquire knowledge of the muscular system, nervous system, respiratory system, cardiovascular system, digestive system, urinary system, integumentary system, genetics, and parasitology.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EQST 1515  or permission of instructor.
  
  • EQST 2520 - Equine Reproduction


    Credits: 3
    This course is a study of the anatomy and physiology of the stallion and mare. Students will associate various hormones with their functions. Breeding systems and methods, including cooled and frozen artificial insemination techniques, will also be explored. In addition, students will study proper mare management and foaling problems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EQST 2500 .
  
  • EQST 2560 - Adv Training Techniques/Equine Eval


    Credits: 4
    In this course, students start a young horse under saddle. Under the direction of the instructor students demonstrate round pen reasoning, correct longeing, sacking out, saddling, introducing a bit, and driving. The horse that is started under saddle will be trained for 30-45 days. A two to four year old horse is provided to each student to gently train and care for according to established training objectives within the equine training program. Evaluation of a horse’s conformation and performance including terms used in horse judging, will also be covered throughout the duration of this class.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EQST 1685 .
  
  • EQST 2570 - Ranch Horse Versatility


    Credits: 2
    All students riding for the LCCC Ranch Horse Team will engage in practice and ride in the four basic stock-horse competitions: reining, working cow horse, stock-horse pleasure, and stock-horse trail. Students will provide their own horses, tack, feed, and equipment. Students are responsible for all aspects of the care of their own horse(s). Students will be assessed a boarding fee per horse, per semester. Team members are required to enroll in this course each semester. All students, regardless of program of study are welcome to try out. Team selection is based on tryouts and instructor approval. May be repeated for additional credit.

    Prerequisite: Instructor Consent.
  
  • EQST 2780 - Intermediate Team Roping


    Credits: 2
    Students learn the correct methods of team roping. Students demonstrate proper horse handling techniques in the box, approach to cattle, and setting cattle for the heeler. Handling livestock, use of equipment for team roping, and physical and mental preparation will be stressed. Students become familiar with the Professional Rodeo Cowboys Association (PRCA) rule book, and safety will be practiced at all times. Enrollment by consent of instructor. A livestock fee will be charged to each student.

    Prerequisite: Students must have the basic horsemanship skills required to rope and ride at the same time.
  
  • EQST 2800 - Fundamentals of Teaching Riding


    Credits: 2
    Students develop the necessary skills to become an effective instructor of riding. Through classroom and arena assignments the student has the opportunity to gain confidence, learn methods of organization, and practice teaching techniques. Students have the opportunity to become certified riding instructors by the Certified Horsemanship Association.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval required.
  
  • EQST 2805 - Equitation


    Credits: 2
    All students riding for the LCCC Intercollegiate Horse Show Association (IHSA) Teams will engage in practice and competition, riding various horses as they increase skills in horsemanship. Students may ride for the IHSA Western or Hunt Seat Team. Horses are provided for LCCC team members.  Team members are required to enroll in this course each semester. All students, regardless of program of study, are welcome to try out. Team selection is based on tryouts and instructor approval.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
  
  • EQST 2970 - Equine Internship


    Credits: 3
    Students apply theoretical and practical knowledge gained in the equine studies classroom and labs through work experience in an equine-related industry in a supervised environment. The equine internship packet must be completed with one of the equine faculty who will also provide site and/or virtual site visits. With faculty assistance, students complete all required paperwork during the internship which will aid in evaluating and describing the internship experience.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in EQST 1685  and ANSC 2560 , and instructor approval required.
  
  • EQST 2975 - Individualized Training


    Credits: 4
    Students work with the instructor in a fully observed atmosphere to refine their advanced training techniques with the goal of obtaining equine performance specialization.

    Prerequisite: Completion of EQST 1685 , EQST 2560  and EQST 2970 . Horses are provided by the equine program, students may request to bring their own horses with approval of instructor.
  
  • EQST 2985 - Equine Business


    Credits: 3
    Students apply knowledge and build skill in topics related to equine business law including taxes, liability, legal issues, current legislation and politics, breeding contracts, syndications, recordkeeping, depreciating facility costs, scheduling, developing employee benefit packages, employee relations, scheduling, and payroll records.


Family and Consumer Sciences

  
  • FCSC 2121 - Child Development


    Credits: 1
    Through theory and observation, students explore the four main domains of child development from birth to age twelve. These domains include physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Students complete in-depth observations, multiple case studies, and a developmental assessment in the course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 2300 .
  
  • FCSC 2122 - Child Development


    Credits: 1
    Through theory and observation, students explore the four main domains of child development from birth to age twelve. These domains include physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development. Students complete in-depth observations, multiple case studies, and a developmental assessment in the course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in PSYC 2300 .

Finance

  
  • FIN 1001 - Personal Financial Planning


    Credits: 1
    Students examine the foundations of personal financial planning. Students explore the following topics: the financial planning process, financial statements, taxes, and the management of basic assets such as cash and savings instruments, and purchasing strategies for consumer goods and automobiles. Students examine key concepts and procedures used in sound personal financial planning and effective money management.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • FIN 1002 - Risk and Credit Management


    Credits: 1
    Students examine the advantages, disadvantages, sources and costs of consumer credit. Students learn how to develop a plan to protect their credit and manage their debts. Students learn the basics of selecting and financing different housing options. Students learn the importance of risk management and how to manage that risk with insurance, including life, disability, health care, and property insurance.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • FIN 1003 - Investment and Retirement Planning


    Credits: 1
    Students learn the fundamentals of personal investing including the factors that influence investment choices. Students examine various types of investments, their risks, and sources of return. Students explore retirement goals and estimate future retirement income needs. Students learn about the role of estate planning in personal financial planning.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • FIN 1100 - Financial Planning and Consulting


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire an understanding of the process financial planning and the components of a comprehensive personal financial plan.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BADM 1020 .
  
  • FIN 1110 - Financial Statement and Credit Analysis


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire knowledge and understanding of business industries and types, why businesses borrow money, and a basic understanding of business financial statements, tax returns and cash flow statements as tools to determine creditworthiness.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2010 .
  
  • FIN 1120 - Investments


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the fundamentals and concepts of various investments from the viewpoint of a financial planner.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2010 .
  
  • FIN 2000 - Principles of Banking


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire knowledge of the principles and theory of the U.S. banking system, with a focus on deposit accounts and payment systems, the lending function and lending regulations, compliance with regulatory laws and requirements, and personal financial planning services.

    Prerequisite: Completion of FIN 1110 .
  
  • FIN 2100 - Corporate Finance


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the theoretical and practical framework for corporate financial management. Topics to be included are financial analysis, time value of money, risk and return, portfolio analysis, capital budgeting, financial assets, and cost of capital.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2020 , MATH 2200  or MATH 2355  and completion of or concurrent enrollment in STAT 2010 , STAT 2050  or STAT 2070 .
  
  • FIN 2200 - Real Estate Principles and Practice


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the fundamentals of real estate practice including; agent roles and responsibilities, mortgage concepts and process, and real estate valuation methods.

    Prerequisite: Completion of FIN 1100 .
  
  • FIN 2470 - Finance Internship I


    Credits: 3
    Students integrate academic experiences with professional experience under the supervision of a manager in a financial institution or a certified financial planner in a cooperating organization. Students engage in the daily operations of the organization as an entry level finance intern.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BADM 1020  and instructor consent.
  
  • FIN 2471 - Finance Internship II


    Credits: 3
    Students integrate academic experiences with professional experience under the supervision of a manager in a financial institution or a certified financial planner in a cooperating organization. Students engage in the daily operations of the organization as an entry level finance intern.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BADM 1020  and instructor consent.
  
  • FIN 4010 - Business Finance


    Credits: 3
    Students evaluate the basic analytical tools required to make value creating financial decisions. Students explore theoretical foundations of finance, such as the time value of money and the risk-return trade-off. Students utilize financial concepts in the practical applications of financial decision-making. Topics covered in the course include analysis of financial and operating performance, assessment of financial health, financial planning, working capital and growth management, valuation of financial and real assets, investment, funding and distribution decisions in the context of non-financial firms.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 3080  and MGT 3210 .

Fire Science

  
  • FIRE 1501 - Principles of Emergency Services


    Credits: 3
    Students explore principles of emergency services, including fire protection, career opportunities in fire protection, and related fields. Students examine the philosophy and history of the fire service, fire loss analysis, and the organization and function of public and private fire protection services. Students analyze fire departments as part of the local government, laws and regulations affecting the fire department, and many other topics specific to the foundation of firefighting and emergency services.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AHA Health Care Provider CPR and/or program manager approval.
  
  • FIRE 1510 - Firefighting Strategy and Tactics I


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the principles of fire control through utilization of personnel, equipment, and extinguishing agents on the scene of a fire.

    Prerequisite: Completion of FIRE 1501  and/or program manager approval.
  
  • FIRE 1625 - Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the use of water in fire protection, apply hydraulic principles, analyze flow demand criteria, and solve water supply problems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0965  or equivalent placement or program manager approval.
  
  • FIRE 1700 - Fundamentals of Fire Prevention


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire fundamental information regarding the history and philosophy of fire prevention, organization, and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use of fire codes; identification and correction of fire hazards; and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investi­gation, and fire and life-safety education.

  
  • FIRE 1725 - Fire Protection Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection, and portable fire extinguishers.

  
  • FIRE 1760 - Building Construction


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. Focusing on firefighter safety, students analyze and apply elements of construction and design that have been shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at an emergency.

  
  • FIRE 1810 - Introduction to Wildland Firefighting


    Credits: 4
    In this course, students prepare for firefighting operations in the wildland sector. Students learn proper tool handling, water use, hose operations, and meteorology. This course is a combination of National Wildland Coordinating Group courses S-190, S-130, and L-180 Human Factors on a Fireline.

  
  • FIRE 1825 - Fire Behavior and Combustion


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled.

  
  • FIRE 2500 - Fire Investigator I


    Credits: 3
    Students develop the fundamental skills and technical knowledge needed for proper fire scene interpretations, including recognizing and conducting origin and cause, preservation of evidence and documentation, scene security, motives of the fire setter, and types of fire causes.

  
  • FIRE 2550 - Fire Investigator II


    Credits: 3
    Students develop advanced skills and technical knowledge on the rule of law, fire scene analysis, fire behavior, evidence collection and preservation, scene documentation, case preparation, and courtroom testimony.

    Prerequisite: Completion of FIRE 2500 .
  
  • FIRE 2610 - Chemistry of Hazardous Materials


    Credits: 3
    Students examine basic fire chemistry relating to the categories of hazardous materials including recognition, reactivity, and health problems that may be encountered by firefighters.

  
  • FIRE 2800 - Fire Academy


    Credits: 4
    In this course, students develop and apply the skills listed in the State of Wyoming Firefighter I and II manipulative skills objectives catalog. Students participate in lecture and drill ground activities. Upon successful completion of the course, students are eligible to take state testing for Firefighter Level I and II certification.

    Prerequisite: Completion of FIRE 1501  or program manager approval.
  
  • FIRE 2970 - Firefighter Field Experience


    Credits: 4-12
    In this course students prepare for life in the fire service. Students participate in the daily duties of an actual fire department. Students act as members of the designated department and perform duties as probationary firefighters. Students observe and participate in actual emergent and non-emergent situations. Credits awarded are based on job experience and/or documented professional certifications.

    Prerequisite: Completion of FIRE 1760 , FIRE 1825 , FIRE 2800  (or current FF Level I or II certification), and/or program director approval.

Geography

  
  • GEOG 1000 - World Regional Geography


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    Students explore the topics of globalization and localization and how they affect world geography. Students apply knowledge on distributions, traits and processes of people and landscapes within specific geographic regions as well as within interconnected global community.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • GEOG 1010 - Intro to Physical Geography


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

    A systematic study of the natural aspects of the geographic environment, including weather and climate, the hydrologic cycle, landforms, soils, flora and fauna. Students learn the principles, concepts and tools within the geography discipline while engaging in the atmospheric processes, exploring the interactions between the biosphere, lithosphere and hydrosphere and investigating the physical forces shaping Earth’s crust.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • GEOG 1020 - Human Geography


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the field of human geography and the tools and techniques which are used to evaluate and describe topics in global resource utilization, population, language, religion, settlement, industry, and agricultural land use.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 .
  
  • GEOG 1040 - Mobile Mapping With GPS


    Credits: 3
    Students learn the fundamentals of Global Positioning System (GPS)/Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) operation, basic geodesy and coordinate system, basic project planning, apply basic mapping skills, create and use data dictionaries, set up and operate GPS receivers, college field data, and import data into a GIS. Students operate a professional level GPS receiver and software package for the class work. This class is applicable for all majors who need to collect data for input into a CAD or GIS mapping system; i.e. agriculture, engineering, engineering/surveying technology, anthropology, construction trades, and law enforcement.

  
  • GEOG 1050 - Introduction to Natural Resources


    Credits: 3
    A course where students examine human interaction with the environment, ranging from regional to global scales. Students become knowledgeable about and gain an understanding of approaches to environmental management. The course emphasizes the scientific aspects of environmental concerns.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
 

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