LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 
    
    May 28, 2024  
LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prerequisites

A prerequisite is designed to help students be successful. Prerequisites also inform prospective students what body of knowledge is necessary to be successful in a particular course.

If a prerequisite course is listed for a subsequent course, the student must have completed satisfactorily (grade of C or better) the prerequisite course, scored at an equivalent level of placement using with high school GPA or ACT, or completed an equivalent course at a college/university that holds institutional accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Equivalent courses must be demonstrated by submitting an official transcript, and final determination will be made by the Office of the Registrar. For additional information, please refer to the “Academic Skills Assessment and Placement Policy ”.

The college has designated English and math prerequisite skill levels for many of the courses in the curriculum. The table below equates placement test levels with a specific developmental course.

This sample course description identifies how to determine the prerequisites for a given course.

PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


Credits: 4
General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.

Students registering for PHYS 1050 must have completed successfully:

 

Accounting

  
  • ACCT 2010 - Principles of Accounting I


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the role of accounting information in business and society. Utilizing critical thinking and decision-making skills, students prepare and analyze financial information using Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Students evaluate how financial information is used in making business decisions.

    Prerequisite: ENGL 0810  and MATH 0965  (or equivalent placement).
  
  • ACCT 2020 - Principles of Accounting II


    Credits: 3
    ACCT 2020 is a continuation of ACCT 2010 . Students analyze and prepare accounting transactions for partnerships and prepare a Statement of Cash Flow in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. Students are introduced to managerial accounting concepts including creating and evaluating reports and information needed by management for decision-making and monitoring purposes.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2010 .
  
  • ACCT 2110 - Quickbooks Accounting


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate the practical application of accounting utilizing current software. Students create accounting records for businesses and utilize fundamental accounting concepts within the computerized system to address problem-solving situations. Topics covered include the general ledger, accounts receivable, accounts payable, job costing, and payroll.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2010  or equivalent preparation.
  
  • ACCT 2230 - Intermediate Accounting I


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire knowledge of the principles and theory of accounting relating to financial statements, accounting information systems, the Income Statement and related information, Statement of Cash Flows, cash, receivables, and valuation of inventories.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2020 .
  
  • ACCT 2430 - Income Tax


    Credits: 3
    A study of the fundamentals of individual federal income taxation designed to help students acquire an understanding of federal income tax determination, personal and dependency exemptions, gross income concepts, inclusions and exclusions, and general deductions and losses. Emphasis is placed on form completions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2010 , or instructor approval.
  
  • ACCT 2450 - Cost Accounting


    Credits: 3
    Students apply the fundamental principles of managerial cost accounting including the accumulation and reporting of accounting information needed for product and standard costing as well as information for planning, decision making and control activities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2020 .
  
  • ACCT 2460 - Payroll Accounting


    Credits: 3
    Students examine employment legislature and tax laws that affect a company’s payroll structure. Students acquire a practical working knowledge in maintaining payroll records, computing gross pay, calculating payroll taxes, analyzing and journalizing payroll transactions, utilizing a computerized payroll system, and payroll reporting requirements and forms.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ACCT 2010 .
  
  • ACCT 2470 - Accounting Internship I


    Credits: 3
    Students integrate academic experiences with professional experience under the supervision of an accounting professional in a cooperating organization. Students engage in the daily operations of the organization as an entry level accounting intern.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BADM 1020  and instructor consent.
  
  • ACCT 2471 - Accounting Internship II


    Credits: 3
    Students integrate academic experiences with professional experience under the supervision of an accounting professional in a cooperating organization. Students engage in the daily operations of the organization as an entry level accounting intern.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2470  and instructor consent.
  
  • ACCT 2800 - Certified Bookkeeper Exam Review


    Credits: 3
    A capstone course designed for students within the Accounting Services program who wish to acquire a professional bookkeeping certification credential. Students will acquire knowledge and skills needed to carry out all key accounting functions through adjusting entries and financial statements including payroll. Students will be prepared to take the Certified Bookkeeper exam administered by the American Institute of Professional Bookkeepers.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ACCT 2020  and ACCT 2460 .
  
  • ACCT 3080 - Accounting for Decision Makers


    Credits: 3
    Students consider the use of accounting information by external users and management. Students develop skills in interpreting and utilizing earnings statements, balance sheets, and cash flow reports to effectively manage strategic operations for their business. Students will work with internal and external stakeholders to apply product and service costing to the development of a budget.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MGT 3210 .

Agriculture

  
  • AGRI 1500 - Introduction to Rodeo


    Credits: 2
    Students are introduced to the history, culture, and business of rodeo. Students acquire knowledge about rodeo organizations, rough stock, timed events, rodeo production, and professional rules and policies.

  
  • AGRI 1510 - Rodeo Livestock


    Credits: 2
    A course that introduces the student to the business of rodeo livestock. Students acquire practical, hands-on experience with livestock leasing, purchasing, sorting, training, and management. Students also gain rodeo production experience from the stock contractor’s point of view and in accordance with NIRA rules regarding rodeo livestock.

  
  • AGRI 2470 - Agriculture Internship I


    Credits: 8
    Students engage in supervised work experience in an agriculture related business or production operation with emphasis on technical and employable skill development. Students employ academic knowledge in real world application. Students develop a stronger skill set and resume for future agricultural employment.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • AGRI 2471 - Agriculture Internships II


    Credits: 8
    Students engage in supervised work experience in an agriculture related business or production operation with emphasis on technical and employable skill development. Students employ academic knowledge into real world application. Students develop a stronger skill set and resume for future agricultural employment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AGRI 2470 .

Agriculture-Agricultural Economics

  
  • AGEC 1010 - Agricultural Macroeconomics


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the impact of governmental policy on society and the agriculture industry in this introductory course which focuses on the role of agriculture in a market based on economy. Students develop an understanding of how the U.S. food and fiber system is influenced by the economic problem of scarcity.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • AGEC 1020 - Agricultural Economics II


    Credits: 3
    An introductory course in which students will practice and apply contemporary microeconomic principles to navigate the economic problem of resource scarcity. The primary focus of this course is on the decision-making of producers and consumers in agricultural and natural resource markets. Market structure and market failure are explored to justify the role of government to protect health, culture, and nature.

  
  • AGEC 2010 - Farm-Ranch Business Records


    Credits: 2
    Students apply economic principles and accounting methods to organizational decision-making and operations. Students create farm enterprise and cash flow budgets, income statements, and balance sheets for farm and ranch enterprises. Students analyze records created to help in making financial decisions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0900 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • AGEC 2020 - Farm-Ranch Business Management


    Credits: 4
    Students apply the tools of management and decision-making to problems found in agricultural operations. Exploration of the four functions of management provides an understanding of the complex issues facing the farm or ranch manager. Using community case studies, students practice market research, financial records analysis, crop and livestock enterprise analysis, risk management, and farm business organizational planning.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in AGEC 1020 .
  
  • AGEC 2400 - Farm Credit and Finance


    Credits: 4
    Students conduct financial analysis of agricultural businesses, including solvency, liquidity, risk and return, capital budgeting methods, and analysis of land investments. Students will examine the sources and costs of credit available for agriculture. Students will culminate their experience by creating a farm or ranch management plan for a complete year’s operation using records built throughout the semester.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AGEC 2020 .
  
  • AGEC 2805 - Equine and Agribusiness Law


    Credits: 3
    Students apply knowledge and build skills in topics related to business law within the context of the agriculture and equine industries. Topics include real property, estate planning and farm succession, liability, legal issues, current legislation and politics, breeding contracts, syndications, developing employee benefit packages, employee relations, and payroll records.


Agriculture-Agroecology

  
  • AECL 1000 - Agroecology


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical & Life (NS)

    Students explore meteorology, soil science and hydrology, chemistry and nutrition, and ecology as related to food, energy, water, and agriculture systems. Students will work with their peers to engage in the scientific method and access and evaluate popular and scientific media while practicing science-informed decision-making.

  
  • AECL 2010 - The Ecological Web: Soils


    Credits: 4
    Students are introduced to soil science including the formation of soils, soil ecology, the biological properties of the soil affecting plant growth, the chemical and physical properties of soil affecting nutrient storage and availability, and the different compositions of fertilizers and their interactions with soils and plants.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0900 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • AECL 2395 - Agricultural Science Research Methods Capstone


    Credits: 3
    Students engage in an in-depth study of a relevant topic in agriculture or rangeland ecology. Students engage in critical thinking and cooperative, collaborative work on current topics and/or topics of historical importance to agriculture or rangeland ecology. Sustainable food production, small-farming, local marketing, land use planning, government programs, and research are also addressed. The capstone project requires students to apply learned knowledge, gather new information from professionals, and perform research resulting in a written report and a capstone presentation.

    Prerequisite: Students graduating from the agriculture program and approval of their adviser.

Agriculture-Animal Science

  
  • ANSC 1010 - Intro to Animal Science


    Credits: 4
    A course introducing students to the scope of the livestock industry, and management of beef cattle, sheep, dairy cattle, swine and poultry. Students are exposed to a foundation knowledge base in livestock breeding, genetics, reproduction and nutrition. Students also learn about products produced in animal agriculture such as wool, meat (pork, lamb and beef), dairy, and poultry products. Additionally, students explain current political and socioeconomic issues in the animal agriculture industry.

  
  • ANSC 1030 - Equine Management


    Credits: 4
    Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts in equine management. Students acquire an understanding of history, breed characteristics, skeletal anatomy, dentistry, and basic hoof care of horses. Students explore equine health management principles and practices, including a practical examination of equine nutrition, diseases, and vaccines. Students learn to identify lameness and differentiate  between various types of lameness. Foundation knowledge of equine husbandry and care is applied to an industry setting with the use of hands-on laboratories.

  
  • ANSC 1070 - Livestock Fitting and Showing


    Credits: 2
    All students competing for the LCCC Livestock Show Team will engage in practice and competitions. Livestock is provided by LCCC and/or area producers. Students will learn the scope and process of the livestock showing industry. Students will learn proper techniques to fit and show relevant livestock species. Students are involved with the actual fitting practices, entries for show, show ring, and they participate in breaking and training of livestock for show. Eligible students may compete in such shows as the National Western Stock Show, etc. Team members are required to enroll in this course each semester. Team selection is based on instructor approval.  May be repeated for credit

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent
  
  • ANSC 1100 - Artificial Insemination


    Credits: 2
    This is an introductory course on Artificial Insemination of cattle. Students will describe the basic bovine anatomy and physiology, the bovine female endocrine system and reproductive cycles. Students will demonstrate proper technique in semen handling and artificial insemination. Students will become familiar with heat synchronization and the management of cattle before, during, and after artificial insemination and the associated cost and benefits.

  
  • ANSC 1210 - Livestock Judging


    Credits: 2
    All students competing for the LCCC Livestock Judging Team will engage in practice and competition evaluating relevant livestock species based on conformation and performance data. Livestock for practices is provided by the College and area livestock producers. Eligible students have the opportunity to compete in major national contests such as Houston Livestock Show, NAILE, National Western Stock Show, etc. Livestock judging team members are required to enroll in this course each semester. Team selection is based on instructor approval.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent
  
  • ANSC 1220 - Livestock Judging II


    Credits: 2
    Continuation of ANSC 1210 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of ANSC 1210 .
  
  • ANSC 1260 - Livestock Merchandising


    Credits: 2
    Students gain experience in organizing and managing a livestock auction through hands-on experiences. Students work with consignors to advertise, set up sale facilities, and facilitate proper transport regulations pertaining to interstate and intrastate travel for livestock. In addition to hands-on experience, the course provides an overview of marketing strategies used in everyday livestock operations. Students explore the costs and risks of different marketing strategies including designing a marketing budget.

  
  • ANSC 2020 - Feeds and Feeding


    Credits: 4
    Students learn the fundamentals of nutrition and how they apply to proper livestock management. Students also explore balancing feed rations and utilizing resources to formulate feeding plans to meet production expectations while managing feed costs.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0900 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • ANSC 2025 - Livestock Nutrition


    Credits: 2
    Students examine the fundamentals of livestock nutrition and how they apply to proper management. Students explore different feed rations and begin to develop a feeding plan.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0900  or equivalent placement, and ANSC 1010 .
  
  • ANSC 2230 - Livestock Judging III


    Credits: 2
    A continuation of ANSC 1220 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of ANSC 1220 .
  
  • ANSC 2320 - Livestock Health and Management


    Credits: 2
    Students develop a basic knowledge of commonly occurring livestock diseases: identification, prevention, and treatment. Through a hands-on approach, students develop knowledge of proper housing, disinfecting, and vaccinating livestock using United States Department of Agriculture and American Veterinary Medical Association guidelines and regulations. Additionally, students study animal anatomy and physiology in order to understand the diseases and their potential impact on different body systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ANSC 1010 .
  
  • ANSC 2560 - Reproductive Technology


    Credits: 3
    This course is focused on reproductive technologies for use in all livestock and horses. Topics covered for all species include anatomy and physiology of reproductive organs, the endocrine system and reproductive cycles. Students will demonstrate proper technique in semen handling and artificial insemination. Students will become familiar with heat synchronization and the management of livestock and horses before, during, and after artificial insemination and the associated cost and benefits. Pregnancy and parturition will also be covered.


Range Management

  
  • REWM 2000 - Principles of Range Management


    Credits: 3
    Students study the basic principles and practices of range management as they apply to the western and northwestern regions. Students examine the relationship of range management to livestock production, wildlife management, hydrology, forage production and other land uses.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0900 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • REWM 2400 - Range Ecosystems and Plants


    Credits: 4
    Students discover the dominant plant species, disturbance regimes, and management challenges of the major ecosystems of western North America. Students identify dominant woody, forb, grass, and grass-like species of these ecosystems, primarily by sight recognition of characteristic morphological features as well as taxonomic keys. Students examine the interactions between abiotic factors, disturbance regimes, and native and non-native species that create biogeographic variation among ecosystems as well as challenges and opportunities for land managers. Students are recommended to complete REWM 2000  prior to registration.


Air Force

  
  • AS 100 - Heritage and Values (AIR1010/AS1020)


    This course provides an introduction to the Air Force and allows students to examine general aspects of the Department of the Air Force, AF Leadership, Air Force benefits, and opportunities for AF officers. The course also lays the foundation for becoming an Airman by outlining our heritage and values. As a foundational course, AS100 also provides a historical perspective such as lessons on war and US military, AF operations, principles of war, and airpower. As a whole, this course provides students with a knowledge-level understanding for the employment of air and space power, from an institutional, doctrinal, and historical perspective. The students will be introduced to the Air Force way of life and gain knowledge on what it means to be an Airman. .

  
  • AS 200 - Team and Leadership Fundamentals (AIR2010/AS2020)


    This course is designed to provide a fundamental understanding of both leadership and team building. There are many layers to leadership, including aspects that don’t always come to mind, which include listening, understanding themselves, being a good follower and efficient problem solving. The students will apply these leadership perspectives when completing team building activities and discussing things like conflict management. Students will demonstrate basic verbal and written communication skills. Cadets will apply these lessons at Field Training, which follows the AS200 year.

  
  • AS 300 - Leading People and Effective Communication (AIR3010/AS3020)


    This course is designed to build on the leadership fundamentals taught in AS 200  and help the cadets utilize these new skills as they begin more of a leadership role in the detachment. Cadets will learn about leading people and the course will provide them with the tools to use in their detachment leadership roles. Cadets will continue to hone their writing and briefing skills. The course continues into advanced leadership skills and ethics training that will prepare them for becoming an officer and a supervisor.

  
  • AS 400 - National Security/Leadership Responsibilities & Commissioning Preparation (AIR4010/AS4020)


    This course presents the basic elements of national security policy and process. Cadets will learn about air and space power operations as well as understand selected roles of the military in society and current domestic and international issues affecting the military profession. Cadets will learn about the responsibility, authority, and functions of an Air Force commander and selected provisions of the military justice system. The final semester of the AS400 course is designed to prepare cadets for life as a second lieutenant.


American Studies

  
  • AMST 2010 - Introduction to American Studies


    Credits: 3
    This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary study of American culture. Students explore themes, values, and ideas that continue to resound throughout our cultural experience, focusing on individuals, ideas, and events that have defined what it means to be an American in context of past and current historical events. In the field of American studies, students develop an understanding of American cultures, identities, artifacts, landscapes, and institutions from a variety of viewpoints, building layers of meaning and interpretation for the objects studied.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • AMST 2110 - Cultural Diversity in America


    Credits: 3
    This course is designed to examine multicultural relations in the United States by exploring how common elements of humanity bind together individuals and groups of people. Students gain an understanding of issues related to social interaction, the concept of race, social class, age, gender, sexual orientation, and the sociology of minorities. Students also acquire an awareness of the constraints and motivations of many diverse populations including Native Americans, Hispanic-Americans, African-Americans, and Asian-Americans.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.

Anthropology

  
  • ANTH 1100 - Introduction to Biological Anthropology


    Credits: 4
    An introductory course in physical/biological anthropology in which students are expected to become knowledgeable about and gain an understanding of mankind’s primate background, human osteology, human genetics and variation, fossil primates, and fossil man. An archaeological overview of cultural evolution in the Old World from fossil man to the peopling of the New World are presented. Students engage in experiments and other exercises during weekly laboratory sessions and demonstrate a working knowledge of the scientific method.

  
  • ANTH 1200 - Introduction to Cultural Anthropology


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    An introductory course in cultural anthropology. Students demonstrate knowledge of basic concepts in social and cultural anthropology including ecological-economic systems, social and political organization, language, magico-religious beliefs, and culture change.

  
  • ANTH 1300 - Introduction to Archaeology


    Credits: 3
    Students become knowledgeable about the ways in which prehistoric cultural remains provide an understanding of the shared cultural life ways of humankind. In addition to surveying basic archaeological theory, field methods and the laboratory analysis of field data, students learn about the evolution of culture, the growth and development of early Old World and New World civilizations, how cultures function, why they change, what similarities they shared broadly among cultures, and why cultures differ from one another.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0910  or equivalent placement.
  
  • ANTH 2210 - North American Indians


    Credits: 3
    Students survey American Indian cultures north of Mexico at the time of the first contact with Europeans. Students acquire and demonstrate knowledge of detailed ethnographic and ethnohistorical comparisons of selected North American Indian cultural areas.


Army

  
  • ARMY 1010 - Leadership and Personal Development


    Credits: 3
    Students explore basic leadership application through classroom instruction, leadership training and mentorship, adventure exercises and camaraderie. Students explore and participate in managerial operations and military techniques. Students apply military customs and techniques through physical and mental training.

  
  • ARMY 1020 - Introduction to Leadership


    Credits: 3
    As a continuation course to ARMY 1010 , students further explore basic leadership application through classroom instruction, leadership training and mentorship, adventure exercises and camaraderie. Students explore and participate in managerial operations and military techniques. Students apply military customs and techniques through physical and mental training.

  
  • ARMY 2010 - Foundations of Leadership


    Credits: 3
    Students learn to apply the intermediate principles of leadership and small unit management applicable to all careers through instruction in land navigation, Leadership Laboratory, field training exercises, troop leading procedures, operations orders, and cultural awareness.

  
  • ARMY 2020 - Foundations of Tactical Leadership


    Credits: 3
    Students apply the intermediate principles of leadership and small unit management applicable to all careers through instruction in land navigation, Leadership Laboratory, field training exercises, U.S. Army customs, courtesies and career opportunities, and various leadership dimensions.


Art

  
  • ART 1000 - General Studio Art


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    This course is intended for non-art majors. A basic introduction to art through various art media. Students explore and experiment with different art materials and techniques by creating and developing a number of basic projects.

  
  • ART 1005 - Drawing I


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students investigate the visual vocabulary required in drawing and gain an understanding of the basic form and techniques used to render realistic as well as expressive drawings. Students use a variety of media such as pencil, conte, charcoal, ink and pastels.

  
  • ART 1010 - Intro to Art


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    This course is not equal to or a replacement for the required art history courses for art majors. This is a one-semester, lecture-based introduction to the theories, techniques, concepts, and materials of art. Students define and describe the constructs underlying fine art such as visual literacy, themes of art, use of light and color, principles of design, and describe how these constructs are manifested in such art forms as sculpture, painting, drawing, ceramics, video, photography, architecture, etc. Students describe ways in which works of art exemplify principles and techniques of various media. Students also explore relationships between these concepts and sequential art history spanning ancient to contemporary movements.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • ART 1110 - Foundation: Two Dimensional


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students explore the principles of art structure through a series of exercises in the visual organization of line, plane, value, mass, texture, shape, movement, and color. Students work in a studio environment and discover individual solutions to two dimensional challenges. This course is offered every fall.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • ART 1120 - Foundation: Three Dimensional


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the principles of art structure through a series of exercises in the visual organization of line, plane, value, mass, texture, shape, space, movement, and color. Students work in a studio environment and discover individual solutions to three dimensional challenges. This course is offered every Spring.

  
  • ART 1130 - Foundation: Color


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the principles of art structure through a series of exercises in the visual organization of color. Students work in a studio environment and discover individual solutions to color theory challenges.

  
  • ART 1250 - Water-Based Media I


    Credits: 3
    Students practice a wide variety of technical processes with water-based media and develop their compositional skills. Through classroom critiques, students analyze multiple solutions to painting problems.

  
  • ART 1260 - Water-Based Media II


    Credits: 3
    In this continuation of ART 1250 , students explore color theory and experiment with color palettes to produce desired effects. Students study the work of contemporary and historical painters and create original works of art that reflect that knowledge.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 1250 .
  
  • ART 1510 - Handbuilt Ceramics


    Credits: 3
    An introductory course in basic ceramic techniques for sculpture production designed especially for non-majors. Students apply technical knowledge to form, glaze, and fire sculpture and trace historical trends in sculpture and contemporary sculptors. To practice design concepts, students produce a freestanding form, a series of multiple form sculptures, and an independent project. (This course does not fulfill LCCC’s humanities/fine arts requirement.).

  
  • ART 2005 - Drawing II


    Credits: 3
    In this continuation of ART 1005 , students practice designing more sophisticated solutions to studio problems, and approaching alternative materials. Through classroom critiques, students analyze multiple solutions to drawing problems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 1005 .
  
  • ART 2010 - Art History I


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire introductory knowledge of the major arts of the world from pre-history to medieval, including pre-historic European, ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, Aegean, Greek, Etruscan, Roman, African, Chinese, Japanese, Indian art and art from the Americas, through the Middle Ages. Also included is art from the Byzantine, Medieval, Romanesque, Gothic, Judaic, Christian, and Islamic movements.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • ART 2020 - Art History II


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire introductory knowledge of the major arts of the world from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Rococo periods to the modern and post-modern eras, including the arts of Africa, China, Japan, Pacific Island cultures, and the Americas.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • ART 2050 - Life Drawing I


    Credits: 3
    This course provides instruction for drawing the human form. Working from clothed and nude models, students demonstrate an understanding of line, value, composition, realistic interpretation, self-expression, and the human form as art.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 1005  or equivalent skills. Instructor approval required.
  
  • ART 2060 - Life Drawing II


    Credits: 3
    In this continuation of ART 2050 , students expand and refine their skills in drawing the human form. Working from clothed and nude models, students demonstrate an under­standing of line, value, composition, realistic interpretation, self-expression, and the human form as art.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 2050 . Instructor approval required.
  
  • ART 2075 - Illustration


    Credits: 3
    In this course, students apply elements of image making, concept, style, composition, and the design process to the broad field of illustration. Students use traditional and nontraditional art materials and approaches (including digital) in the creation of illustrative images in a range of styles and formats. Students use and enhance an overall visual vocabulary, including cartooning, comic art, photography, drawing/painting, type, the elements/principles of design, and digital imaging.

  
  • ART 2080 - Drawing III


    Credits: 3
    In this continuation of ART 1060, students create a thematic series of works and present them with a written descriptive analysis. Students prepare their work for exhibition and build a portfolio.

  
  • ART 2090 - Printmaking


    Credits: 3
    Students gain skills in the use of materials and techniques for creating original art through the indirect process of printmaking. Students also design the surface used to print the image(s). Art projects include relief printing and monoprinting.

  
  • ART 2210 - Painting I


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students utilize a variety of painting techniques and art terms to produce a portfolio of work based upon design elements and principles. The historically significant works of contemporary painters and old masters are reflected in student projects. Topics include color and light phenomena in nature and in painting. Students are encouraged to produce unique work and to understand their artistic intentions.

  
  • ART 2220 - Painting II


    Credits: 3
    In this continuation of ART 2210 , students continue to practice a variety of painting techniques and to refine their understanding of concepts. Students expand upon their personal strengths and increase their ability to recognize stylistic trends. (Students expecting to work in oils must consult with instructor.)

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 2210 .
  
  • ART 2235 - Advanced Painting


    Credits: 3
    Students develop an understanding of the “process” of creating paintings within the parameters of a variety of painting techniques. Individual solutions to group assignments are discussed within classroom critiques.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval required based on drawing and painting skills.
  
  • ART 2310 - Sculpture I


    Credits: 3
    An introductory course in additive and subtractive construction of three-dimensional form. Students trace the historical trends in sculpture, recognize contemporary sculptors, and develop a vocabulary that can be used in discussing sculpture. Emphasis is on the presentation of studio problems and their solutions through personal expression.

  
  • ART 2320 - Sculpture II


    Credits: 3
    A course in the study of three-dimensional form building upon knowledge gained in ART 2310 . Investigation continues in the varied techniques of sculpture including welded metal, stone carving, and clay working. Students manipulate the form and imagery in representational and nonrepresentational art work. Emphasis is on current sculptural applications and the work of contemporary sculptors.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 2310 .
  
  • ART 2410 - Ceramics I


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students learn the fundamentals of pottery construction, glazing, and firing techniques. Students apply skills to hand-building, wheel-throwing and surface methods. An emphasis is on the formative stages of the clay-working process.

  
  • ART 2420 - Ceramics II


    Credits: 3
    Students focus on wheel-throwing pottery and evaluation of completed clay forms. Students explore technical information concerning clays, glazes and firing processes as well as historical trends in pottery.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 2410 .
  
  • ART 2430 - Ceramics III


    Credits: 3
    A continuation of ART 2420  with emphasis on the development of pottery form and a vocabulary that can be utilized in discussing ceramics. Students become knowledgeable about contemporary clay-working artists.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ART 2420 .

Astronomy

  
  • ASTR 1050 - Survey of Astronomy


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

    Students gain a greater understanding of astronomy through direct observation, laboratory application, and lecture. Students compare the planets and satellites in our solar system; distinguish the processes involved in the life, birth, and death of stars; and recognize unique objects such as quasars and black holes. Designed primarily for non-science majors. This course is not offered every semester.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 1000  or higher or instructor permission. Recommended placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010 .

Automotive Body Repair

  
  • AUBR 1500 - Auto Body Hand/Hydraulic tools


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction into the auto body repair field, focusing on hand, power, and hydraulic tools common to the trade. Students identify different tools available for repairs and demonstrate their proper and safe usage through various shop projects including vehicle trim and hardware identification and removal, as well as exterior panel replacement. Students gain skill in determining the proper selection and use of personal protection equipment required for hazardous materials found in body/paint shops.

  
  • AUBR 1510 - Introduction to Auto Body Repair


    Credits: 3
    An introductory course in auto body repair. Students develop knowledge of basic procedures used in auto body repair. Students gain skill in and knowledge of shop safety, tools and equipment, metal straightening basics, welding basics, trim and accessories, and painting and refinishing procedures.

  
  • AUBR 1520 - Collision Damage Appraising


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire and demonstrate knowledge of different estimating systems, manuals, and procedures used in the auto body repair field. Students prepare both handwritten estimates and computer-generated estimates using P-page logic and abbreviations. Students gain knowledge in all aspects of the estimating process including customer service, visual analysis, supplements, organization, and insurance influences.

  
  • AUBR 1540 - Auto Body Welding


    Credits: 3
    Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to identify the different types of metal used in today’s vehicle construction and determine the limitations of different alloys. Students explore the different welding equipment and techniques available to repair shops and gain skill in performing the weld styles common to body repair and panel replacement.

  
  • AUBR 1550 - Auto Body Repair I


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the fundamentals of collision repair, straightening non-structural steel, and moveable glass replacement. Students gain skill in identifying the characteristics of different metals and plastic fillers and demonstrate industry repair procedures for dent removal.

  
  • AUBR 1560 - Auto Body Repair II


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of AUBR 1550 . Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to identify and demonstrate repair procedures for the different types of plastics and aluminum used in today’s vehicle construction. Students also explore the use of techniques for adhesive bonding.

  
  • AUBR 1570 - Auto Body Repair III


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of AUBR 1560 . Students continue to gain knowledge and skill development in repair procedures for damaged automotive sheet metals and plastics. In addition, students explore new vehicle materials and designs, safety fea­tures, park-assist systems, collision warning systems, and alternative fuel systems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUBR 1560 .
  
  • AUBR 1580 - Auto Body Repair IV


    Credits: 3
    This course is the last in the Auto Body Repair series of courses. Students explore safe working procedures for auto body repairs on high voltage vehicles. Students also gain knowledge and skill in identifying different foam applications and their intended purpose in modern vehicles.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUBR 1570 .
  
  • AUBR 1710 - Frame and Chassis I


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction into frame designs, unibody structural parts, and steering/suspension components. Students examine different types of measuring and straightening equipment for structural parts and demonstrate their proper and safe usage. Students also identify the common types of suspension design and the parts contained in each.

  
  • AUBR 1720 - Frame and Chassis II


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of AUBR 1710 . Students demonstrate structural damage analysis and repair techniques for steel and aluminum structural parts. Students gain the skills necessary to identify, repair properly, and work safely around restraint system components. Students also explore heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning components commonly damaged in front-end collisions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUBR 1710 .
  
  • AUBR 1810 - Collision Damage Repair I


    Credits: 3
    Students examine procedures for repairing extensive body damage including welded or bonded outer body panel and structural parts replacement. Previous auto body repair and welding experience recommended.

  
  • AUBR 1820 - Collision Damage Repair II


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of AUBR 1810 . Students gain experience performing structural parts repair, replacement, and sectioning following industry-approved procedures. Students explore welding techniques for advanced high-strength steels, as well as replacement procedures for stationary glass.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUBR 1810  and AUBR 1540 .
  
  • AUBR 1910 - Auto Paint I


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to vehicle refinishing. Students examine different types of refinishing equipment and materials designed to duplicate factory finishes. They develop skills in surface preparation, masking vehicles, and application techniques for different refinish products.

  
  • AUBR 1920 - Auto Paint II


    Credits: 4
    This course is a continuation of AUBR 1910 . Students acquire and demonstrate basic knowledge and skill in spot repairs, color matching, paint mixing, and overall refinish procedures. Students also examine the identification, causes, and corrections for common paint problems.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUBR 1910 .
  
  • AUBR 1930 - Auto Paint III


    Credits: 4
    This course is a continuation of AUBR 1920 . Students exhibit a greater proficiency in the skills demonstrated in AUBR 1910  and 1920. Students explore multi-stage, and water-borne paint systems, as well as detailing and post-repair vehicle inspections.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUBR 1920 .
  
  • AUBR 1945 - Introduction to Automotive Custom Paint


    Credits: 3
    This course is an introduction to the paints, techniques, and equipment used in automotive custom painting. Students examine color theory, paint systems, masking/stencil techniques, and freehand airbrush designs through instructor-guided projects. Students gain knowledge and skill in the control, proper use, disassembly, and cleaning of an airbrush. Students also demonstrate proficiency in the use of pinstriping brushes. Students are required to provide their own dual-action airbrush.


Automotive Technology

  
  • AUTO 1500 - Basic Auto Mechanics


    Credits: 3
    Students gain and demonstrate knowledge and skills to understand the automotive service industry and to perform basic preventive maintenance, service procedures, and engine repair. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list A1-A8.

  
  • AUTO 1510 - Engine System Fundamentals


    Credits: 4
    This course provides a basic introduction to engine operation, design, and service procedures. Students demonstrate precision measuring, engine disassembly and reassembly, diagnosis of engine problems, cylinder head reconditioning, and parts analysis. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list for Engine Repair A-1. It is recommended students take AUTO 1500  prior to taking this course.

  
  • AUTO 1600 - Fuel Systems I


    Credits: 4
    Students demonstrate the skills necessary for diagnoses and repair of various types of today’s fuel delivery and electronic injection systems in this ASE certified course. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list for Engine Performance A-8.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 2560 .
  
  • AUTO 1690 - Manual Power Train Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    This course will cover the theory of 3-speed and 4-speed manual transmissions. Students gain practical experience in the overhaul of manual transmissions, clutches, related parts, and specialized equipment. Proper use of hand tools and safety in the lab will be emphasized. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task lists for Manual Drive Train and Axles A-3.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 2550 .
  
  • AUTO 1730 - Automatic Transmissions


    Credits: 4
    This course will cover the theory of automatic transmissions. Students gain practical experience in the overhaul of automatic transmissions in popular use today. Proper use of hand tools and specialized equipment and safety in the lab will be emphasized. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list for Automatic Transmissions A-2. 

  
  • AUTO 1740 - Brake Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students learn the theory, service, and repair of automotive braking systems and their components. Emphasis is on hydraulic and anti-lock brake theory; the repair of service booster units, master cylinders, and wheel cylinders; caliper rebuilds; and drum and rotor service. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list for Brakes A-5.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 1765  or DESL 1545 .
 

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9