LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 
    
    Feb 25, 2024  
LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prerequisites

A prerequisite is designed to help students be successful. Prerequisites also inform prospective students what body of knowledge is necessary to be successful in a particular course.

If a prerequisite course is listed for a subsequent course, the student must have completed satisfactorily (grade of C or better) the prerequisite course, scored at an equivalent level of placement using with high school GPA or ACT, or completed an equivalent course at a college/university that holds institutional accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Equivalent courses must be demonstrated by submitting an official transcript, and final determination will be made by the Office of the Registrar. For additional information, please refer to the “Academic Skills Assessment and Placement Policy ”.

The college has designated English and math prerequisite skill levels for many of the courses in the curriculum. The table below equates placement test levels with a specific developmental course.

This sample course description identifies how to determine the prerequisites for a given course.

PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


Credits: 4
General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.

Students registering for PHYS 1050 must have completed successfully:

 

Music

  
  • MUSC 2072 - Applied Music Instruction IV


    Credits: 1
    Private music lessons in voice, piano, organ, guitar, woodwind, brass, percussion, and string instruments with an approved college instructor. The student pays an additional lesson fee. May be repeated for up to eight times for credit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MUSC 2071 .
  
  • MUSC 2150 - Guitar II


    Credits: 1
    Students build on fundamentals and review bar chords, major and minor scales, two- and three-part harmony and various arpeggio picking patterns. Melodic development and solo playing will be included. May be repeated for up to two times for credit.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MUSC 1150 .
  
  • MUSC 2290 - Class Piano III


    Credits: 1
    The third semester of a four-semester sequence for the beginning piano student. Students continue to develop skills in finger control, hand independence, and pedal technique. Students continue to acquire and demonstrate skill in sight-reading (homophonic pieces, score part-reading, and hymnal reading), harmonization of melodies using all diatonic chords or prescribed chord progressions, and all harmonic minor scales. Students also demonstrate skills in transposition, basic accompanying techniques, and singing and playing together.

     

     

    Prerequisite: Completion of MUSC 1295  or successful completion of the final exam requirements for MUSC 1295 .

  
  • MUSC 2295 - Class Piano IV


    Credits: 1
    The fourth semester of a four-semester sequence for the piano student. Students continue to develop skills in finger control, hand independence, and pedal technique. Students continue to acquire and demonstrate skill in sight-reading (homophonic pieces, score part-reading, and hymnal reading), harmonization of melodies using all diatonic chords or prescribed chord progressions, and all major and harmonic minor scales. Students will also demonstrate skills in transposition, basic accompanying techniques, and singing and playing together. All skills will help students prepare for the piano proficiency exam.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MUSC 2290  or successful completion of the final exam requirements for MUSC 2290 .
  
  • MUSC 2320 - Diction for Singers I


    Credits: 2
    This class teaches the appropriate pronun­ciation of Italian and German languages for singing purposes. Students study phonetics, the science of speech sounds. Students will learn to apply the appropriate pronunciation of the languages throughout the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).

  
  • MUSC 2325 - Diction for Singers II


    Credits: 2
    Students study phonetics, the science of speech sounds. This class teaches the appropriate pronunciation of English and French languages for singing purposes. Students learn to apply the appropriate pronunciation of the languages throughout the use of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA).

    Prerequisite: Completion of MUSC 2320 .
  
  • MUSC 2395 - Piano Proficiency


    Credits: 0
    Students demonstrate piano proficiency through this course which serves as a final comprehensive exam in piano techniques. The exam focuses on scales, harmonization, sight-reading, transposition, folksong harmonization, accompaniment, prepared patriotic songs, and the correct use of the pedal.


Paralegal

  
  • LEGL 1500 - Intro to Paralegal Studies


    Credits: 3
    Introduction to Paralegal Studies is an introductory study of the American legal system with emphasis on the nature of legal processes and institutions. Students examine the American and Wyoming judicial systems, legal reasoning, ethical standards, and those procedural and substantive aspects of the law pertinent to the paralegal. Paralegal Studies majors are strongly encouraged to have completed or be currently enrolled in ENGL 1010 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0965  and ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • LEGL 1710 - Legal Research and Writing I


    Credits: 3
    Students explore legal research techniques and methods used in the practice of law, including electronic legal research. The course is designed to develop skills in legal reasoning, identifying and effectively using legal resources, and writing basic legal memoranda.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in LEGL 1500  or instructor approval.
  
  • LEGL 1720 - Legal Research and Writing II


    Credits: 3
    A continuation of LEGL 1710  with emphasis on the advanced application of legal research principles. Topics covered include the preparation of various documents and memoranda and the application of a variety of research skills and sources.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500  and LEGL 1710  or equivalent or permission of legal assistant advisor.
  
  • LEGL 1800 - Law Office Management


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire skills in managing a law office by developing an understanding of the basic administration, management, and technological aspects of today’s firm. Students develop an understanding of law office structures, time and record-keeping systems, and general office procedures. Students will be exposed to ethical considerations faced by non-lawyer professionals as well as to professional development for the non-lawyer.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500 .
  
  • LEGL 2500 - Civil Procedure


    Credits: 3
    A continuation of LEGL 2550 . A study of the litigation process, including the Federal and Wyoming Rules of Civil Procedure. Students acquire skills in performing the functions and duties of a legal assistant in the litigation process, including the drafting of documents, such as pleadings, motions, discovery documents, and trial notebooks.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500  and LEGL 1710 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • LEGL 2550 - Evidence and Investigation


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate skills in interviewing clients and witnesses and locating information necessary when preparing a case for trial. Students apply the basic state and federal rules governing the admissibility of evidence and acquire skills in preparing and handling evidence for courtroom use. Students prepare a variety of pre-trial documents. Paralegal majors must take this course prior to enrolling in LEGL 2500 . Because LEGL 2500  is a continuation of this course, students are strongly encouraged to take these courses in consecutive semesters.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in LEGL 1710 , ENGL 1010 , or permission of instructor.
  
  • LEGL 2560 - Probate Practices and Procedures


    Credits: 3
    Students explore probate and nonprobate assets; with the formation, modification, revocation, execution, and validity of wills; with the laws of intestacy; with the administration and closing of estates. Students examine various forms, procedures, and tax consequences involved in probating an estate.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in LEGL 1500  or instructor approval.
  
  • LEGL 2570 - Torts


    Credits: 3
    A study of the principles behind personal injury settlements and litigation, with an emphasis on Wyoming law. Topics include intentional torts, negligence, and strict liability.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500  or permission of instructor.
  
  • LEGL 2610 - Family Law


    Credits: 3
    Students develop an awareness of the paralegal’s role in the practice of family law. Students demonstrate an ability to produce documents concerning the formation and dissolution of marriage, property rights of married and unmarried couples, and parent-child relationships (including adoption, custody, and support). Students demonstrate knowledge of the tax consequences, basic legal procedures, and ethical practices involved in the practice of family law.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in LEGL 1500  or instructor approval.
  
  • LEGL 2630 - Real Estate and Property Law


    Credits: 3
    A study of the law of real property and a survey of the more common types of real estate transactions. Students demonstrate the ability to prepare instruments necessary to complete various real estate transactions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500  or permission of instructor.
  
  • LEGL 2650 - Criminal Law and Procedure


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate knowledge of statutory and common law crimes, including criminal law theory and the construction and interpretation of criminal law statutes. Students draft motions, prepare orders, and learn to interview criminal clients and to provide other office support necessary in criminal law practice.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500  or permission of instructor.
  
  • LEGL 2670 - Constitutional Law


    Credits: 3
    Students study the basic principles and applications of constitutional law in an historical context. Each section of the course material will focus on four key concepts: limited government, the protection of private property, the promotion of commerce, and individual rights, with an emphasis on individual rights and due process. Students explore the impact of state and federal constitutional requirements on the development of the American legal system and the process by which United States Supreme Court accepts and decides cases.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500  or permission of the instructor. Successful completion of ENGL 1010  is highly recommended.
  
  • LEGL 2680 - Administrative Law


    Credits: 3
    Students develop an understanding of the principles of administrative law, administrative remedies, and administrative hearing procedures in various state and federal governmental agencies. Topics include social security, EEOC, workers’ compensation, as well as other areas of administrative law. The course focuses on several practical problems in areas where paralegals frequently are employed.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in LEGL 1500  or instructor approval.
  
  • LEGL 2830 - Computer Applications in the Law


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate an awareness of available materials and demonstrate skills required in working with an automated law practice. Projects in this introductory course include, but are not limited to, the areas of timekeeping and billing, substantive systems, word processing, document composition, litigation control, and legal research. Students also develop skills with WordPerfect software and a variety of spreadsheets.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500 , LEGL 1710 , CMAP 1200  or equivalent or permission of instructor.
  
  • LEGL 2990 - Paralegal Internship


    Credits: 3-5
    Students demonstrate the ability to apply theoretical knowledge gained in the classroom by interning in a private office, governmental agency, court, or private business which utilizes attorneys. Students participate in any required seminars and produce documents describing and evaluating the internship experience.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LEGL 1500 , LEGL 1710 , LEGL 1720 , LEGL 2500 , and LEGL 2550 , and permission of instructor. (S/U grade only.).

Philosophy

  
  • PHIL 1000 - Introduction to Philosophy


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the fundamental academic disciplines in philosophy and their respective issues and theories including world views, metaphysics, epistemology, logic, ethics, and theology.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • PHIL 2311 - Introduction to Religion


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the basic components of religion and survey the major religions of the world: Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto. Students gain an understanding of the theoretical, practical, and sociological aspects of each religion.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.

Physical and Health Education - PE Activities

  
  • PEAC 1011 - Aquatic Conditioning


    Credits: 1
    Students acquire knowledge of fitness components-cardiovascular endurance, flexibility, muscular strength and endurance-and how these components are achieved using water to provide resistance. Students of all swimming abilities are encouraged to take this course.

  
  • PEAC 1012 - Beginning Swimming


    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate basic swimming components-water safety, breathing, kicking, and basic strokes of freestyle, backstroke, and breaststroke.

  
  • PEAC 1016 - Swimnastics


    Credits: 1
    Students acquire knowledge using water workouts to increase and maintain range of motion, flexibility, and strength. Students will, based on their comfort level, perform workouts in both the shallow and deep end of the pool.

  
  • PEAC 1026 - Zumba Fitness


    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate the basic steps involved for different types of dance such as Reggaeton, Cumbia, Salsa, and Merengue. Through the use of dance, students improve their cardiovascular endurance, coordination, muscle tone and flexibility.

  
  • PEAC 1031 - Western and Social Dance


    Credits: 1
    This course provides instruction in dance steps which relate to contemporary western and social dance. Students apply elementary principles and techniques in western and social dance and develop the ability to perform basic movement patterns and analyze music as it relates to western and social dance.

  
  • PEAC 1046 - Introduction to Pilates


    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate the principles of Pilates, which are concentration, control, center breath, fluidity, and precision. Students develop functional fitness, which allows students to more efficiently participate in daily lifetime activities.

  
  • PEAC 1047 - Introduction to Spinning


    Credits: 1
    Spinning is a comprehensive indoor cycling class. Students demonstrate proper basic riding form and techniques as well as knowledge of nutrition and muscle mechanics. In addition, students develop cycling skills and improve muscle tone, cardiovascular conditioning, and strength through a series of performance drills.

  
  • PEAC 1245 - Beginning Fencing


    Credits: 1
    Students apply knowledge of the rules, terminology and skills for the sport of Fencing, particularly the foil. After completing the course, the students will have learned the fundamental skills to continue with Fencing as a lifetime activity or as a competitive sport.

  
  • PEAC 1294 - Beginning Yoga


    Credits: 1
    Students explore the benefits of combining physical activity (beneficial movements and postures) with mental discipline (body awareness and regulated breathing). Students achieve, according to their abilities and commitment, greater flexibility, strength, better balance, deeper relaxation, regulated breathing, and heightened body awareness.

  
  • PEAC 1295 - Individualized Exercise Programs


    Credits: 1
    Students examine their current level of fitness and investigate the relationships between wellness and an active lifestyle and its impact on their overall health. Students develop, implement, and modify a program geared to their specific fitness and wellness needs.

  
  • PEAC 1298 - Snowshoeing


    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate selection of proper clothing, footwear, and snowshoe equipment. Students demonstrate safety considerations associated with snowshoeing and practice minimum impact principles as well as prevention and treatment of cold weather related injuries such as frostbite, hypothermia and dehydration. Additionally, students are introduced to map reading as well as land navigation.

  
  • PEAC 2011 - Intermediate Swimming


    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate advanced skills with four swim strokes-front crawl, backstroke, breaststroke, and butterfly-and improve their skills with treading water, swimming underwater, turns and dives. Students recognize the cardiovascular benefits of swimming.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAC 1012  or instructor approval.

Physical and Health Education - Varsity Sports

  
  • PEAT 1000 - Varsity I


    Credits: 1
    Students enhance knowledge of specific sports unique to LCCC. Students learn offensive and defensive systems, rules, scoring, and other team-related concepts. A livestock fee will be charged to each Rodeo student-athlete. Fall only

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent required. 
  
  • PEAT 1005 - Varsity II


    Credits: 1
    This is a continuation of Varsity I. Students examine strength training principles for their respective sport. Students develop individual skills specific to the sport in which students are competing. A livestock fee will be charged to Rodeo student-athletes.  Spring only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 1000 .
  
  • PEAT 1890 - Athletic Conditioning I


    Credits: 1
    This is the first course in a four course progression. Students engage in sport-specific conditioning that may include weight lifting, plyometrics, sprints, interval workouts, cross-training, or other sport-based workouts. Students acquire skills and drills specific to a sport. Instructor permission required. 

    Prerequisite: Instructor Consent
  
  • PEAT 1891 - Athletic Conditioning II


    Credits: 1
    This is the second course in a four course progression. Students advance their sport-specific conditioning, which may include weight lifting, plyometrics, sprints, interval workouts, cross-training, or other sport-based workouts.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 1890 .
  
  • PEAT 2000 - Varsity III


    Credits: 1
    This is the third of a four course sequence of Varsity courses. Students develop advanced team concepts as well as sport-specific physical conditioning skills. A livestock fee will be charged to each Rodeo student-athlete.  Fall only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 1005 .
  
  • PEAT 2005 - Varsity IV


    Credits: 1
    This is a continuation of the Varsity classes. Students focus on sport-specific strength and cardiovascular conditioning needs. Students do self-analysis of areas of strength and areas to work, specific to their sport. A livestock fee will be charged to Rodeo student-athletes.  Spring only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 2000 .
  
  • PEAT 2890 - Athletic Conditioning III


    This is the third course in a four course progression. Students build sport-specific skills such as agility and power. Students implement fitness principles of progression, overload, recovery, and periodization. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 1891 .
  
  • PEAT 2891 - Athletic Conditioning IV


    Credits: 1
    This is the fourth course in a four course progression.  Student continue to develop performance-based skills such as agility, power, and force. Prerequisite: PEAT 2890.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 2890 .
  
  • PEAT 3000 - Varsity V


    Credits: 1
    This is a continuation of Varsity IV and is intended for Rodeo students who are entering into either of the Bachelor of Science programs offered by LCCC. Students develop individual skills unique to the sport of Rodeo. A livestock fee will be charged to each Rodeo student-athlete. Fall only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 2005 .
  
  • PEAT 3005 - Varsity VI


    Credits: 1
    Students further enhance skills and knowledge in the individual events so competition levels are increased at NIRA-sponsored events. Students perform mechanical consistency, execute mental and physical preparation, demonstrate appropriate safety procedures, and administer concise event rules. A livestock fee will be charged to each student. Spring only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 3000 .
  
  • PEAT 4000 - Varsity VII


    Credits: 1
    Students elevate basic knowledge in the individual events so they can ride competitively at NIRA-sponsored events. Students demonstrate mechanical consistency, substantial improvement in their mental and physical preparation, safety procedures, and event rules. A livestock fee will be charged to each student. Fall only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 3005 .
  
  • PEAT 4005 - Varsity VIII


    Credits: 1
    Students further enhance skills and knowledge in the individual events so competition levels are increased at NIRA-sponsored events. Students demonstrate mechanical consistency, coordinate mental and physical preparation, demonstrate appropriate safety procedures, and administer concise event rules. A livestock fee will be charged to each student. Spring only

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEAT 4000 .

Physical and Health Education - Professional PE

  
  • PEPR 1470 - PETE Practicum I


    Credits: 1
    Students work in conjunction with Exercise Science instructors to provide physical education activities to students from 6-17 years of age in a variety of settings. In this level 1 practicum, students assist in various ways within the Physical Education setting. Students also observe physical education teachers in action at public and private schools in the community. This is the first of a three practicum sequence. Instructor consent required.

  
  • PEPR 2050 - Prevention and Care of Athletic Injuries


    Credits: 2
    Students recognize how to prevent and treat specific sport injuries resulting from activities in the home, recreational, intramural, and sport settings. Students identify preventative measures and proper treatment for specific sport injuries. Students demonstrate proper taping and wrapping techniques.

  
  • PEPR 2100 - Theory of Coaching


    Credits: 3
    Students develop sport specific principles of coaching. Students examine multiple aspects of coaching from the fields of sport psychology, sport pedagogy, sport physiology, sport medicine, and sport management. Students discuss coaching issues and principles of developing and maintaining a sport program with primary focus on the secondary level. Students examine leadership approaches, organization and practice techniques utilized in coaching as well as conditioning for injury prevention. Students also explore the challenges and expectations of the coach in the community.

  
  • PEPR 2110 - Foundations of Coaching


    Credits: 3
    This introductory course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the foundation of coaching. Students explore the scientific basis for coaching
    sports and the process of developing competent student-athletes.  Students develop an individual coaching philosophy.  Students apply scientific
    training in the psychological, physiological, pedagogical, and managerial basis of sport coaching to demonstrate understanding of the ”Athletes First, Winning Second” philosophy.

  
  • PEPR 2470 - PETE Practicum II


    Credits: 1
    Students work with Exercise Science instructors to provide physical education activities to students from 6-17 years of age in a variety of settings. In this level 2 practicum, students, with the guidance of Exercise Science faculty, plan and are lead instructor for several lessons within the Physical Education setting. This is the second of a three practicum sequence.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEPR 1470 .
  
  • PEPR 2475 - PETE Practicum III


    Credits: 1
    Students work with Exercise Science instructors to provide physical education activities to students from 6-17 years of age in a variety of settings. In this level 3 practicum under the guidance of Exercise Science faculty, students plan and lead the instruction for two units of study within a Physical Education setting. For successful completion of the course, students must complete the course with a C or higher.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PEPR 2470 .

Physical Therapist Assistant

  
  • PTAT 1600 - Introduction to Physical Therapist Assistant


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the field of Physical Therapy (PT) from the development of the profession to current clinical practices. Students discuss the role of the PTA, ethical and legal issues that guide practice, psychosocial aspects of healthcare, specialty areas of PT practice, components of the plan of care, and patient care essentials. Students practice oral and written communication skills including essential documentation skills.

    Prerequisite: Admission into the Physical Therapist Assistant program.
  
  • PTAT 1650 - Therapeutic Procedures I


    Credits: 4
    Students develop knowledge and skills essential to the practice of physical therapy including assessment and utilization of assistive devices, body mechanics, functional training, mobility, pain, positioning and transfer techniques, vital signs, wheelchairs, and other therapeutic procedures. Students practice techniques including edema management, compression wrapping, infection control procedures, massage techniques and taping techniques.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 2030 .
  
  • PTAT 1660 - Therapeutic Procedures II


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the principles and practices of physical therapy including assessment and measurement of pain and inflammation as it relates to the use of modalities. The students also assess and apply a variety of modalities including: thermal agents, cryotherapy, ultrasound, infrared, electrical stimulation (TENS, FES, IFC, EMG, and Biofeedback), diathermy, mechanical traction, manual traction, iontophoresis, and phonophoresis.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 1720 .
  
  • PTAT 1720 - Therapeutic Exercise


    Credits: 4
    Students explore the theory, principles, and implementation of therapeutic exercise pro­grams for a variety of patient populations. In addition, they apply specific strategies for stretching (sustained hold, contract/relax, strain/counterstrain), strengthening (isometrics, isotonics, open/closed chain, resistive exercises, weight training, aquatics), and balance and coordination activities. Students also examine theories of motor control and motor learning, and implement these theories into clinical practice. Lab activities will involve therapeutic exercise programs set up, joint mobilizations, and Proprioceptive Neuromuscular Facilitation (PNF) techniques and implementation in the clinical setting.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 2030 .
  
  • PTAT 1740 - Cardiac Rehabilitation


    Credits: 2
    Students explore an in-depth description of cardiopulmonary rehabilitation and develop skills to implement cardiac protocols, assess and monitor common cardiopulmonary conditions, identify cardiac precautions for a variety of patient populations, and perform postural drainage techniques. Students design fitness and wellness programs for healthy and diseased individuals.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 2030 .
  
  • PTAT 1800 - Neurology


    Credits: 3
    Students examine multiple pathologies of the nervous system including stroke, demyelinating diseases, spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s Disease, cerebral palsy, and traumatic brain injuries (TBI). In addition, students contrast normal structures and function of the nervous system, including motor control centers of the brain and spinal tracts, to a nervous system with specific impairments. Students develop skills to assess, treat, and manage the neurologically impaired patient based on clinical signs and symptoms of neurological disorders.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 2970 .
  
  • PTAT 1820 - Orthopedics


    Credits: 4
    Students identify and assess common orthopedic conditions and analyze findings to implement intervention strategies and develop comprehensive treatment plans under the direction and supervision of a physical therapist. Students participate in case studies common to orthopedic conditions including amputations. Students learn to progress physical therapy plans of care for a variety of orthopedic and postsurgical conditions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 1720 .
  
  • PTAT 1840 - Specialty Rehabilitation


    Credits: 1
    Students explore an in-depth overview of specialty areas of physical therapy practice including burns, chronic pain, geriatrics, lymphedema, pediatrics, vestibular rehabilitation, women’s health, and wound care. Students utilize assessment tools specific to these areas of specialty to develop intervention strategies for improvements in function and to minimize disability.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 2970 .
  
  • PTAT 2030 - Functional Kinesiology for the Physical Therapist Assistant


    Credits: 4
    Students explore the application of human anatomy to the study of human movement patterns. Students identify normal versus abnormal movement with the use of posture analysis, gait analysis, functional movement and sport activities. Students apply information demonstrated for data collection including manual muscle testing, goniometry measurements, and palpation techniques to the application in the physical therapy field.

    Prerequisite: Admission into the Physical Therapist Assistant program.
  
  • PTAT 2970 - PTA Clinical Practicum I


    Credits: 7
    This course provides students with selected experiences to provide practical clinical experience under the direct supervision of a physical therapist/physical therapist assistant and instruction of LCCC’s clinical coordinator. The clinical experience gives students the opportunity to correlate didactic course work with clinical skills. Students are required to complete a minimum of 280-hour clinical rotation at an affiliate site that provides physical therapy services.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 1720 .
  
  • PTAT 2971 - PTA Clinical Practicum II


    Credits: 7
    This course provides students with selected experiences to provide practical clinical experience under the direct supervision of a physical therapist/physical therapist assistant and instruction of LCCC’s clinical coordinator, to meet entry-level PTA requirements. This clinical experience gives students the opportunity to correlate didactic coursework with clinical skills. Students are required to complete a minimum of 280 hours of clinical at an affiliate site that provides physical therapy services. In addition, students must complete a mandatory competency capstone for the program.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PTAT 2970 .

Physics

  
  • PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

    In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.
  
  • PHYS 1090 - Fundamentals of the Physical Universe


    Credits: 4
    Students apply fundamental principles of chemistry and physics to real life situations. The course is designed primarily for elementary education majors.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 1000  or equivalent placement.
  
  • PHYS 1110 - General Physics I


    Credits: 4
    This is the first course of a two-semester sequence in elementary college-level physics with a laboratory component. Upon successful completion of this course, students gain an understanding of mechanics, vector mechanics for static bodies, dynamic of linear and circular motion, and energy transfer methods. This algebra-based course is intended primarily for pre-professional health science (premedical, predental, preoptometry, prephysical therapy, etc.) and biology students. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1110 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050  or PHYS 1310 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 1405  or MATH 1450 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • PHYS 1120 - General Physics II


    Credits: 4
    A second-semester course in elementary college-level physics that includes a laboratory component. Students learn wave phenomena, electricity, and the fundamental structure of matter. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1120 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050  or PHYS 1320 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of PHYS 1110  or instructor approval.
  
  • PHYS 1310 - College Physics I


    Credits: 4
    A calculus-based introductory physics course with a laboratory component intended primarily for engineering, physical science, computer sciences, and mathematics students. Students acquire a working knowledge of vector mechanics, dynamics of linear and circular motion, energy and momentum techniques, and mechanical waves. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1310 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050  or PHYS 1110 . Typically offered Fall semester only.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 2200 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in MATH 2205 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • PHYS 1320 - College Physics II


    Credits: 4
    This is the second course of a two-semester sequence in calculus-based physics with a laboratory component. Students gain knowledge and apply problem solving skills in electricity, magnetism, and thermodynamics. This course is intended primarily for engineering, physical science, computer sciences, and mathematics students. Students receiving credit for PHYS 1320 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1050  or PHYS 1120 . May be offered in Fall or Spring semesters.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PHYS 1310  or completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 2210 .

Plumbing Technology

  
  • FMT 1700 - Introduction to Plumbing


    Credits: 3
    Students become familiar with the tools and equipment of the plumbing trade. Basic skills needed to enter the plumbing career field will be developed. Students will identify safety practices and methods used in the workplace as described in the Plumbing Code.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1712  and IST 1713 .
  
  • FMT 1710 - Plumbing Pipefitting


    Credits: 3
    Students practice the procedures and safety requirements of installing components used for various plumbing applications. Students will complete a typical pipefitting project to include drawing its layout.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1560 .
  
  • FMT 1720 - Plumbing Piping, Water


    Credits: 3
    Students examine different types of water piping, fittings, and proper installation procedures. Students develop skills in joining and supporting various piping according to the Plumbing Code.

    Prerequisite: Completion of HMDV 1510 .
  
  • FMT 1730 - Plumbing Installation


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the installation and repair of fixtures, faucets, and various valves used in the plumbing trade. Students will also be introduced to manufacturer’s installation recommendations, uniform plumbing code, and good housekeeping practices.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1660  and IST 1661 .

Political Science

  
  • POLS 1000 - American and Wyoming Government


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Society & the Individual - Wyoming Statutory Requirement (HSI)

    POLS 1000 is a college-level introductory course in the organization and structure of the governments of the United States and Wyoming. Students explore the three branches of government (legislative, executive, and judicial) and learn to think critically about them. They also evaluate themes in federalism, civil liberties, civil rights, public opinion, political parties, campaigns and elections, and selected public policy topics. This course meets the state statutory requirement for instruction in the United States and Wyoming constitutions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810 .
  
  • POLS 1009 - Introductory Experiential Civics


    Credits: 3
    Students focus on practical experiences in government while learning values associated with citizenship. This course is taught to participants of Wyoming Boy’s State. This course does not satisfy the state statutory requirement for instruction in the United States and Wyoming.

  
  • POLS 1100 - Wyoming Government


    Credits: 1
    Students examine the constitution and government of Wyoming. Students review the major principles and institutions of the U.S. government. This course is designed for students who have earned credit for American Government or U.S. History at an out-of-state college or by advanced placement but have not fulfilled the Wyoming Constitution statutory requirement.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 .
  
  • POLS 1200 - Non-Western Political Cultures


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the distinctive political institutions and practices that characterize select non-western political cultures. Case studies from Asia and Africa are emphasized in this course. Completion of ENGL 1010  or equivalent is strongly recommended.

    Prerequisite: Completion of POLS 1000  or consent of instructor.
  
  • POLS 2000 - Current Issues in American Government


    Credits: 3
    Students investigate select political topics and issues by exploring key public policy problems, the policy-making process, and policy choices. Students are expected to keep abreast of both domestic and global political events and to apply basic political science concepts to analyze them. A variety of American political ideologies are also examined.

    Prerequisite: Completion of POLS 1000  or instructor approval.
  
  • POLS 2310 - Intro to International Relations


    Credits: 3
    An analysis of the political relations of nations emphasizing methods of explaining and interpreting their behavior. With contemporary problems serving as illustrations, students critically evaluate topics in war and peace, international political economy, and the evolving world order. Because many political science instructors require research papers, ENGL 1010  or its equivalent is strongly recommended.

    Prerequisite: Completion of POLS 1000  or instructor approval.
  
  • POLS 2410 - Intro to Public Administration


    Credits: 3
    Students learn to analyze the principles, methods and practices involved in administering the public sector. Students gain knowledge about government finance, budgeting, organizational theory, personnel practices, human behavior, government and computers, and the responsiveness of governmental administrators to the public. Because many political science instructors require research papers, ENGL 1010  or its equivalent is strongly recommended.

    Prerequisite: Completion of POLS 1000 .

Psychology

  
  • PSYC 1000 - General Psychology


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    Students employ concepts in the field of psychology as they apply to: development of behavior; physiological mechanisms of behavior; perception; motivation and emotion; learning; intelligence; individuality and personality; and mental health.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 .
  
  • PSYC 1100 - Organizational Human Relations


    Credits: 3
    Students practice using systematic knowledge from psychology to understand and explain individual human behavior within organizations. Students explore interactions in organizations by examining human perceptions, communications, small group dynamics, power, quality of work life and leadership. Students demonstrate how both organizational goals and personal goals fit within organizations.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • PSYC 2000 - Research Psychological Methods


    Credits: 4
    In this course students use fundamental scientific methods in psychology. Students acquire and employ research strategies ranging from observational to experimental. Students demonstrate the ability to design topic proposals, conduct basic research, gather data, perform statistical analyses, interpret results, critique published research, read and write in scientific style, and use the American Psychological Association format.

    Prerequisite: PSYC 1000  and STAT 2050  or STAT 2070 .
  
  • PSYC 2080 - Biological Psychology


    Credits: 3
    This course is designed as a general introduction to the biological bases of behavior. Students learn the structural and functional properties of the human nervous system, although comparisons to other animals will be made. Students examine how environment, genetics, and evolution has influenced the physiological and sensory mechanisms of behavior.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1003  or BIOL 1010  and PSYC 1000 .
  
  • PSYC 2090 - Psychology of Religion


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the relationship between religion and human behavior, including theories of religion, the history of the psychology of religion, stages of religion development, religious experience and conversion, and religion and well being.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000  and ENGL 1010 .
  
  • PSYC 2210 - Drugs and Behavior


    Credits: 3
    Students gain an understanding of how psychoactive substances affect behavior, including both psychotherapeutic agents and other drugs with abuse potential. Students demonstrate awareness of basic brain chemistry and the effects of psychoactive substances on brain functioning. Students explore behavioral, social, historical, and medical aspects of each major class of psychoactive substances.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000  and ENGL 1010 , or instructor approval.
  
  • PSYC 2300 - Developmental Psychology


    Credits: 3
    Students gain knowledge in the development and behavior of children from conception through adolescence with emphasis on the major roles played by maturation and learning. Students examine development theory, research findings, and applications to current issues in child psychology.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000  and ENGL 1010 , or instructor approval.
  
  • PSYC 2330 - Psychology of Adjustment


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the common problems of adjustment with an emphasis on understanding the psychological principles and social factors that bear on mental health.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 , or instructor approval.
  
  • PSYC 2340 - Abnormal Psychology


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the biological, psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral, human-existential, and sociocultural models of abnormality, as well as, the psychological and psychopharmacological treatments shown to be effective for specific mental disorders.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000  and ENGL 1010 .
  
  • PSYC 2380 - Social Psychology


    Credits: 3
    Students examine general theories and concepts of social psychology. In addition, students demonstrate the ability to apply the theories in the analysis of a specific issue or social setting. Topics include research techniques, social perception, social influence, social relations, and application. The entering student should have a solid understanding of basic concepts of psychology (PSYC 1000 ) as well as good writing skills (ENGL 1010 ).

    Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000  and ENGL 1010 , or instructor approval.
  
  • PSYC 2395 - Psychology Capstone


    Credits: 1
    Students consolidate the entire spectrum of their educational experience to design a post-graduation plan for transfer and/or employment. Students engage in a service learning project to enhance civic responsibility. Students reflect upon major competencies developed over their time as a student at LCCC. Students integrate their cumulative knowledge into a portfolio.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 , PSYC 2000 , PSYC 2300 , PSYC 2340 , and PSYC 2380  or instructor consent.

Radiology Technology

  
  • RDTK 1503 - Introduction to Radiography


    Credits: 4
    An introductory course covering the history of radiography, radiographic and general medical terminology; introductory radiographic equipment, radiation protection; and abdomen, chest, and upper-extremity positioning. Students become knowledgeable about ethical and legal issues and basic radiology safety. During the last half of the semester, students begin clinical rotations and by semester end, competency and proficiency in chest, abdomen, and upper extremity radiography are achieved.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Radiography program, competency to enter into ENGL 1010 , and MATH 1000  or MATH 1400  or equivalent placement.
  
  • RDTK 1520 - Radiographic Patient Skills


    Credits: 1
    An introduction to patient care skills used in the radiography field. Students demonstrate skills in communicating, evaluating, protecting, and providing physical care for the patient while in the radiology department. This course fulfills a course requirement of the Radiography Program.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the program.
  
  • RDTK 1583 - Radiographic Procedures I


    Credits: 3
    A continuation of RDTK 1503 . This course is designed to introduce the student to the anatomy and positioning of additional radiographic examinations. Specifically, the student learns and develops positioning skills for the shoulder girdle, lower extremity, pelvis, entire spine, sternum, ribs, portables, trauma, and reviews geriatric and pediatric radiography. The student also demonstrates competency in the anatomy, positioning, and radiographic demonstration of the gastrointestinal (alimentary canal) system, the genitourinary system. Students complete I.V. training and identify and describe the characteristics of various contrast media, radiologic pharmaceuticals, contrast reactions, and the responsibilities of the radiographer in such situations.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1503 .
  
  • RDTK 1584 - Radiographic Lab I


    Credits: 1
    A course to be taken concurrently with RDTK 1583 , which allows the simulated application of the principles learned in RDTK 1583  and film critique. The student radiographer becomes proficient at exposing, developing, and critiquing radiographs of the shoulder, lower extremity, pelvis, entire spine, sternum, and ribs in the campus lab. Students also perform gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and biliary procedures in a competent manner through simulated applications.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RDTK 1583 .
  
  • RDTK 1590 - Clinical Education I


    Credits: 4
    This course provides clinical experience in the radiology department and is to be taken during the Spring I semester. Students refine positioning and critique skills learned in RDTK 1503 , RDTK 1583 , and RDTK 1584 . Under supervision in the clinical setting, students will be able to competently perform routine diagnostic imaging of the chest, abdomen, extremities, and spines. Students will be expected to pass a competency-based imaging test at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1503 .
  
  • RDTK 1610 - Radiographic Imaging I


    Credits: 3
    In this course, students outline the physical theories of X-ray production and the atomic interactions which take place during the radiologic image acquisition process. Students analyze radiographic images and calculate the effects that various technical factors, equipment, accessory devices, and receptor systems have upon radiographic image qualities and patient dose.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1503 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RDTK 1583 , RDTK 1584 , and RDTK 1611 .
  
  • RDTK 1611 - Radiographic Imaging Lab I


    Credits: 1
    Students demonstrate and experiment with the effects of various technical factors, accessories, and receptor systems on radiographic image qualities. Through laboratory experiences, students use the equipment and measuring devices available in the energized lab, evaluate collected data, and apply the concepts covered in RDTK 1610 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1503 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RDTK 1610 .
 

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