LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 
    
    Apr 16, 2024  
LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prerequisites

A prerequisite is designed to help students be successful. Prerequisites also inform prospective students what body of knowledge is necessary to be successful in a particular course.

If a prerequisite course is listed for a subsequent course, the student must have completed satisfactorily (grade of C or better) the prerequisite course, scored at an equivalent level of placement using with high school GPA or ACT, or completed an equivalent course at a college/university that holds institutional accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Equivalent courses must be demonstrated by submitting an official transcript, and final determination will be made by the Office of the Registrar. For additional information, please refer to the “Academic Skills Assessment and Placement Policy ”.

The college has designated English and math prerequisite skill levels for many of the courses in the curriculum. The table below equates placement test levels with a specific developmental course.

This sample course description identifies how to determine the prerequisites for a given course.

PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


Credits: 4
General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.

Students registering for PHYS 1050 must have completed successfully:

 

Automotive Technology

  
  • AUTO 1760 - Heating and Air Conditioning


    Credits: 3
    Students learn basic heating and air conditioning theory. Students diagnose, repair, and recharge air conditioning systems to OEM specifications. Students complete ASE/NATEF task list for Heating and Air Conditioning A-7.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 1690 .
  
  • AUTO 1765 - Automotive Electrical


    Credits: 5
    Students learn the basic theory of electricity, how to read and interpret wiring diagrams, and how to diagnose and repair individual electrical circuits on vehicles. These circuits include lights, horn, electric windows, power seats, electric defrosters, and other electrical circuits installed on vehicles. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list A-6.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 1510 .
  
  • AUTO 2550 - Auto Alignment and Suspension


    Credits: 4
    Students learn suspension and alignment theory. Suspension systems are diagnosed, measured, and repaired to OEM specifications. Wheel alignments will be performed on vehicles and adjusted to OEM specifications. These alignments include 4-wheel center point adjustments. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list A-4.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 1740 .
  
  • AUTO 2560 - Automotive Ignition Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students learn ignition theory and diagnosis and repair of various computerized and non-computerized ignition systems. Emphasis is placed on developing a comprehensive understanding of all electrical components and systems with special emphasis on problem diagnosis. Students work towards completing ASE/NATEF task list A-8.

    Prerequisite: Completion of AUTO 1765 .

Biology

  
  • BIOL 1002 - Discovering Science


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical & Life (NS)

    Students integrate Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and Earth Science through lectures, lab activities, field experiences and discussions. Fundamental concepts from each discipline are concurrently addressed enabling students to engage with science and apply it to larger societal issues.

  
  • BIOL 1003 - Current Issues in Biology


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Life (NSL)

    Students who are non-science majors, take this one semester course to examine central themes of biology-cell biology, genetics, evolution, ecology and scientific methodology, by focusing on current issues in biology and their interrelation to humans and the environment. Students participate in discussion and hands-on laboratory exploration of the content.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0900 .
  
  • BIOL 1010 - General Biology


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Life (NSL)

    Students examine the basic chemistry of living systems, cell structures and functions, energy relations including photosynthesis and cellular respiration, Mendelian and molecular genetics, molecular biology, population dynamics, and evolutionary theory. Students perform experiments during regular laboratory sessions and demonstrate a working knowledge of the scientific method.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0975 , or equivalent placement.
  
  • BIOL 1390 - Intro to Science Research I


    Credits: 4
    An introduction to concepts used in a biological research environment. Students read scientific literature, perform computer-based literature searches, engage in experimental design and data collection, conduct statistical analyses, write a scientific paper, and design a poster. Students may have the opportunity to present their work at a scientific conference.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1010  (with a grade of B or better) and instructor consent.
  
  • BIOL 2022 - Animal Biology


    Credits: 4
    Students examine the anatomy, physiology, ecology and evolution of animal biodiversity. Students demonstrate the ability to compare, contrast, and classify animals based upon shared derived characteristics. Through lectures, discussions, reading and writing assignments, and other activities, students discover the biodiversity of Kingdom Animalia and consider the importance of this biodiversity to themselves, humanity and the biosphere.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1010 .
  
  • BIOL 2023 - Plant and Fungal Biology


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge of how plants and fungi have evolved, what ecological roles they play in the world, and how species are important to humans. Students also contrast and classify plants and fungi and related organisms through their structure and function. This course is offered during fall semesters.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1010 .
  
  • BIOL 2390 - Scientific Research II


    Credits: 4
    This course is a continuation of BIOL 1390 . Motivated students continue to perform scientific research at a higher level than BIOL 1390 . Research II students work more independently in all aspects of research, including designing experiments, collecting data, analyzing results, and writing scientific literature. Research II students provide leadership for a small group of Research I students, being a “project leader” for an experiment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BIOL 1390  and instructor consent.
  
  • BIOL 2465 - Research Problems in Biology


    Credits: 1-3
    Students explore various methodologies employed in biological research, including experimental design, literature searches, data collection, analysis, and research report writing. Students may be required to present their work at public forum.

    Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.
  
  • BIOL 2470 - Field Methods in the Biological Sciences


    Credits: 4
    Students develop an understanding of ecological principles on a broad scale through field exercises, group discussions, research projects, and written assignments. Employing the scientific method in collaboration with students and instructors from another region or country, students examine local ecology as they engage in authentic research projects, on-the-ground conservation, and cultural interactions. Developing biological fundamentals, students delve into the evolution, behavior, population, community and ecosystem ecology, biogeography, physiology, and organismal biology in this region. Besides tuition and mandatory fees, students pay additional cost s that may include but are not limited to airfare, room and board, classes, local tours, and other activities.


Brewing

  
  • BREW 1500 - Safety and Sanitation for Fermentation


    Credits: 3
    Students identify rules, regulations, and practices related to workplace safety in the fermentation industry. Students also become knowledgable in standard brewery sanitation procedures including Clean-in-Place (CIP). 

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1510 - Craft Beer Styles and Sensory Evaluation


    Credits: 3
    Students learn and practice analysis of fermented beverages for quality and adherence to standard style guidelines, analyzing both the characteristics and flaws resulting from raw materials usage and the brewing, fermentation and sanitation processes. Students discuss the chemistry and biochemistry of off-flavors, and methods to avoid future issues. Students will also acquire knowledge of the history and characteristics of standard beer styles and take the Beer Judge Certification Program (BJCP) Entrance Exam.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1520 - Beer Essentials: Grains


    Credits: 1
    Students explore the characteristics of grains used in craft brewing and the processes used to prepare grains for use in brewing.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1530 - Beer Essentials: Hops


    Credits: 1
    Students explore the characteristics of hops used in craft brewing and the processes used to grow, harvest, and prepare hops for use in brewing.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1540 - Beer Essentials: Water and Brewing Chemistry


    Credits: 1
    Students explore the role that water plays in craft brewing. Students gain knowledge in the standard practices for testing and adjusting water for brewing. Students also learn about basic chemistry concepts important for brewing. 

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1550 - Beer Essentials: Microorganisms and Fermentation


    Credits: 1
    Students develop understanding of the biology and characteristics of yeast and other microorganisms used in craft brewing. Students gain hands-on experience working with yeast, and practice proper sanitary techniques for working with microorganisms. 

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1560 - Beer Essentials: Adjuncts and Specialty Ingredients


    Credits: 1
    Students identify adjuncts and specialty ingredients commonly used in craft brewing. 

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1570 - Beer Essentials: Recipe Development


    Credits: 1
    Students integrate knowledge of the ingredients of beer gained in previous Beer Essentials courses to develop recipes for craft brewing. Students gain experience in using brewing software for performing calculations for recipe development. Prerequisite: Instructor consent.

    Prerequisite: Instructor consent.
  
  • BREW 1580 - Brewing I: From Raw Materials to Wort


    Credits: 4
    Students learn and practice the principles and methods of creating wort from raw materials using homebrewing equipment. Students will also observe these processes in commercial craft beer facilities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of BREW 1500 , BREW 1510 , BREW 1520 , BREW 1530 BREW 1540 , BREW 1550 , BREW 1560 , and BREW 1570 
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BREW 1600 .
  
  • BREW 1590 - Brewing II: From Wort to Finished Product


    Credits: 4
    Students learn and practice principles and methods of converting cooled wort into packaged beer using homebrewing equipment. Students will also observe these processes in commercial craft beer facilities. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of BREW 1580 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BREW 1600 .
  
  • BREW 1600 - Brewery Operations


    Credits: 4
    Students learn standard operating procedures for day-to-day work in commercial craft breweries. Students examine the business practices of craft brewing operations, including raw material, scheduling, and equipment processes. Students will also explore legal elements and marketing strategies of brewery operations. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of BREW 1500 
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in BREW 1580  and BREW 1590 .
  
  • BREW 1970 - Craft Brewing Internship


    Credits: 5
    Students apply skills and knowledge learned in previous courses to work as a member of a brewing team in a partner microbrewery. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of BREW 1590  and BREW 1600 .  

Business

  
  • BUSN 2000 - Intro to International Business


    Credits: 3
    Students develop knowledge of the diverse cultural impact on multinational trade, marketing, finance, management, and government policies. Emphasis will be on the cultural dynamics of global business.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.

Business Administration

  
  • BADM 1000 - Introduction to Business


    Credits: 3
    Students relate business concepts to daily lives and careers through a general introduction of basic business concepts and principles.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • BADM 1020 - Business Communication


    Credits: 3
    Students study the principles, strategies, and techniques of effective written, oral, and digital business communication. Emphasis is placed on reviewing grammar and mechanics as students create successful written messages including e-mails, memos, letters, reports, and resumes. Students learn productive techniques to communicate professionally in an increasingly global, digital workplace.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • BADM 2010 - Legal Environment of Business


    Credits: 3
    Students explore a broad overview of business-related legal topics including the nature and sources of law, court systems, common law, statutory law, constitutional law, business torts, intellectual property, product liability, business ethics, and contracts.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • BADM 2030 - Business Ethics


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the nature of ethical behavior in business and its broader implications for society. Students discover the history of ethics in business, factors that impact the ethical decision-making process, and the global aspect of business ethics. Students practice skills and strategies to develop and evaluate a business code of ethics as well as employee training programs on ethical business behavior.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  or instructor approval.
  
  • BADM 3010 - Business and Professional Writing


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Written Communication (WC;UDGE)

    Students enhance writing skills appropriate for professional managers. These may include audience analysis, information design, and the use of visuals. Students study the principles, strategies, and techniques of effective written, oral, and digital communication. Emphasis is placed on creating successful written messages including e-mails, memos, letters, reports, resumes, and proposals. Students apply techniques to communicate professionally in an increasingly global, digital workplace.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • BADM 3020 - Data Analysis for Managers


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the process of data priori­tization and analysis. Students will evaluate how data is utilized within a business or organization, including its appropriate disclosure. Students will learn to interpret the statistical nature of data analysis and the role it plays in managerial decision making. Students will describe how to direct analytic activities to drive the data analysis process towards coherent, useful, and valid results.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MGT 3210 .
  
  • BADM 3210 - Business Ethics


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the nature of ethical behavior in business and its broader implications for society. Students examine the history of ethics in business, factors that impact the ethical decision-making process and the global aspect of business ethics. Students practice skills and strategies to develop and evaluate a business code of ethics as well as employee training programs on ethical business behavior.

  
  • BADM 4600 - Advanced Internship


    Credits: 3
    The internship places students in local and regional business organizations with the intent of providing the student with an advanced understanding of business policy, procedures, and acumen.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval.

Chemistry

  
  • CHEM 1000 - Intro to Chemistry


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

    In this introductory lab science course, students name chemical compounds; write chemical equations; explain and describe physical properties of gases, liquids, and solids; examine atomic structure, chemical bonding, and mass relationships and energy changes in chemical reactions; discuss properties of acids and bases, chemical equilibria, and nuclear chemistry; identify organic functional groups and relate them to biochemistry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  and MATH 0975  or equivalent placement.
  
  • CHEM 1020 - General Chemistry I


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

    Students develop problem-solving skills using the factor-label method, demonstrate proficiency in the use of the metric system, perform laboratory experiments, and use computers/calculators to analyze experimental data. Students examine states of matter, properties of elements and compounds, inorganic nomenclature, atomic theory and structure, chemical bonding, quantitative chemical relationships and energy changes in chemical reactions, and gas laws and kinetic molecular theory.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400  or equivalent placement, and completion of CHEM 1000  or one year high school chemistry is strongly recommended.
  
  • CHEM 1030 - General Chemistry II


    Credits: 4
    Students explain the properties of liquids, solids, and solutions; discuss the structures and properties of organic compounds; examine chemical kinetics, chemical equilibria and its applications, the chemistry of acids and bases, spontaneity of chemical reactions, electrochemistry, and nuclear chemistry. Students also perform laboratory experiments and use computers/calculators to analyze experimental data.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 1020 .
  
  • CHEM 2300 - Introductory Organic Chemistry


    Credits: 4
    This is a one-semester course in organic and beginning biological chemistry with no lab component. Students discuss bonding within molecules; name and draw structures of organic molecules; predict products for reactions of various functional groups, including hydrocarbons, halocarbons, alcohols, carbonyls, and amines; identify and draw stereoisomers; use spectroscopy data to identify molecules; and understand the biological/industrial significance of molecules such as heterocycles, polymers, lipids, carbohydrates, amino acids, and nucleotides.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 1000  or CHEM 1020 .
  
  • CHEM 2420 - Organic Chemistry I


    Credits: 4
    This is the first-semester course of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence. Students draw molecular orbitals and discuss bonding within molecules; name and write structures and reaction products for alkanes and radicals; discuss and distinguish stereoisomers; write the products of substitution and elimination reactions; perform laboratory techniques for the preparation, separation, purification, and characterization of organic compounds; and operate the NMR, FT-IR, GC-MS, and UV-VIS instruments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 1030 .
  
  • CHEM 2440 - Organic Chemistry II


    Credits: 4
    This is the second-semester course of a two-semester organic chemistry sequence. Students name and write structures and reaction products for alkenes & alkynes; write the products of electrophilic aromatic substitution reactions; write structures and reaction products for carbonyl compounds, alcohols, ethers, carboxylic acids and their derivatives (amines, some simple sugars, amino acids, and nucleic acids); and prepare and characterize a number of molecules containing a variety of functional groups (ketones, alcohols, amides, carboxylic acids, and esters).

    Prerequisite: Completion of CHEM 2420 .

Communication

  
  • COMM 1000 - Intro to Mass Media


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    Students examine the historical, economic, social, regulatory, and ethical implications that shape modern media content and function and its impact on diverse populations; critique media for accuracy and ethics using modern fact-checking tools and established media theory models; and explore career opportunities in media fields.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • COMM 1005 - Intercultural Communication


    Credits: 3
    Students examine human communication processes within the context of various cultures. Specifically, students analyze how culture influences our communication with individuals and groups. Students explore the importance of cultural beliefs, attitudes, and values in order to become more competent communicators in co-cultural settings.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • COMM 1015 - Foundations of Communication


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Oral Communication (OC)

    Students explore communication contexts and develop personal and professional skills in the following areas: interpersonal communication, public speaking, and small group communication. Course content includes practice in the application of the principles of listening, verbal and nonverbal communication, group dynamics, and public speaking. This course is designed primarily for applied science degrees and certificate programs.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • COMM 1030 - Interpersonal Communication


    Credits: 3
    Students develop skills in interpersonal communication by examining topics such as perception, identity, listening, nonverbal communication, relationship development, conflict management and diversity.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • COMM 1040 - Intro to Communication Theory


    Credits: 3
    Students analyze human communication experiences by applying theories of intra- and interpersonal communication, group communication, intercultural communication, mass communication, and organizational communication.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010 .
  
  • COMM 2010 - Public Speaking


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Oral Communication (OC)

    Students develop foundational verbal, digital, and written communication skills in this introductory public speaking course. Students practice skills to effectively construct, write, organize, deliver, and critique speeches in a variety of public communication contexts and speaking formats. Students focus on the speech development and the preparation process which includes: analyzing the audience, developing the thesis and main ideas/arguments, researching supporting evidence, applying appropriate writing strategies, organizing and outlining, evaluating and revising speech drafts, using appropriate language, vocal delivery and nonverbal behavior in speech performance, listening, critically thinking and reflecting on the speech and writing process, creating digital messages and exploring digital communication technologies.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in ENGL 1010 .
  
  • COMM 2100 - Media Writing


    Credits: 3
    Intensive practice in gathering and writing news. Topics include journalistic jargon, news judgment, interviewing techniques, law and ethics, computer-assisted reporting, and careers. Students write the following kinds of stories: news, features, roundups, sidebars, follow-ups, obituaries, legislative, statistical, controversial, speeches, meetings, brights, public affairs, news conference, and public relations releases.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement and MMMM 1111 , and some keyboarding skills required.
  
  • COMM 2120 - Small Group Communication


    Credits: 3
    Students develop group communication skills focusing on topics such as group decision making and problem solving techniques, group development and cohesion, conflict management, and leadership principles.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • COMM 2400 - Intro to Photography


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students learn to manually compose photographs with single lens reflex cameras; apply compositional guidelines to photography; critique images emphasizing artistic and journalistic methods; and discuss image aesthetics in relation to historic process and forms of photographic involvement.

  
  • COMM 2400 - Intro to Photography


    Credits: 3
    Students learn to manually compose photographs with single lens reflex cameras in both the digital and film formats; apply compositional guidelines to photography; critique images emphasizing artistic and journalistic methods; discuss image aesthetics in relation to historic process and forms of photographic involvement.


Computer Applications

  
  • CMAP 1200 - Computer Information Systems


    Credits: 3
    A course covering digital electronic devices, hardware, software, the internet, and productivity software currently used in business. Students select and apply appropriate technology to address specific situations. Students evaluate privacy and ethical issues in the use of technology, and students evaluate the impact of technology on society. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • CMAP 1610 - Windows I


    Credits: 1
    Students develop expertise in using the Microsoft Windows operating system. Students explore the basic concepts of managing files and folders, working with programs, customizing the desktop, implementing simple security features, and establishing and using an internet connection.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • CMAP 1615 - Operating Systems


    Credits: 3
    Students install, use, troubleshoot and configure popular operating systems (OS) and prepare to support OS functions. Students take the CompTIA A+ operating system exam. Students explore the startup process, device drivers, hard disk setup and the Microsoft Windows family - setup and upgrade, Linux setup, and DOS basics.

  
  • CMAP 1750 - Introduction to Spreadsheet Applications


    Credits: 1
    Students are provided with a basic understanding of spreadsheet applications. Students learn how to use spreadsheet commands to build and maintain spreadsheets using a popular electronic spreadsheet program.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0965  or equivalent placement.
  
  • CMAP 1815 - Database Applications


    Credits: 3
    A study of the techniques used in file organization, storage, and retrieval using a popular database management system. Students develop advanced skills used in creating and using relational database applications. Emphasis is on business applications.

  
  • CMAP 1886 - Microsoft Outlook


    Credits: 2
    This course introduces students to the popular Microsoft Office Outlook software. Using web and client versions, students develop the ability to customize Outlook, use e-mail client, manage Outlook’s contacts, use Outlook calendar, manage tasks, use Outlook’s journal component, and share folders and files with other Outlook users.

  
  • CMAP 1920 - Computer Hardware Maintenance


    Credits: 4
    Students install, troubleshoot, configure, update, and maintain computer hardware. Students take the CompTIA A+ hardware exam. Students explore systems setup and the classification of RAM, motherboards, processors, multimedia and mass storage devices, power supplies, I/O devices, printers and laptops. Students also perform hardware maintenance and troubleshooting.

  
  • CMAP 1960 - Server Installation and Administration


    Credits: 3
    Students develop the knowledge and skills needed to install and administer Microsoft and Linux servers. Students learn about the architecture, virtualization, installation, server roles, monitoring, performance, disaster recovery, security, and troubleshooting of industry standard servers. Students also learn about system networking including network services and IPv4 and IPv6 addressing. This course also provides a base from which students can study to pass the CompTIA Server+ certification.

  
  • CMAP 2005 - Virtualization


    Credits: 3
    Students develop the skills necessary to install, configure, and manage machines, servers, storage, images, cloud and backup technologies.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSCO 2000  or instructor approval.
  
  • CMAP 2471 - PC Support Skills


    Credits: 1
    Students acquire knowledge and skills in maintaining and troubleshooting PCs. Topics include security, safety, environmental issues, communication, and professionalism, as well as installing, configuring, upgrading, and troubleshooting hardware and operating systems.

  
  • CMAP 2472 - Data Protection and Recovery I


    Credits: 1
    Students acquire knowledge and skills enabling them to explain the process of data corruption and data loss and the steps required to protect data and perform simple data recovery.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CMAP 1615  and CMAP 1920  or instructor approval.
  
  • CMAP 2473 - Data Protection and Recovery II


    Credits: 1
    Students acquire additional knowledge and skills enabling them to explain in detail the process of data corruption and data loss and the advanced steps required to protect data and perform advanced data recovery.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CMAP 2472 .

Computer Applications-Cisco

  
  • CSCO 2000 - Cisco: CCNA I Intro to Networks


    Credits: 3
    Students build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. Students develop skills necessary to plan and design the architecture, structure, functions, component, and models of the Internet and computer networks. Students implement the principles of IP addressing and fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. This is the first of three courses needed to prepare for the Cisco Certified Network Associate (CCNA) certification.

  
  • CSCO 2010 - Cisco: Advanced Internetworking I


    Credits: 3
    This course prepares students to plan and design the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students configure routers and switches for basic functionality. Students configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. This is the second of two courses needed in order to take the Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices 1 (ICND 1) certification exam to earn the Cisco Certified Entry-Level Network Technician (CCENT) title.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSCO 2000  or instructor approval.
  
  • CSCO 2020 - Cisco: Advanced Internetworking II


    Credits: 3
    Students plan and design the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a large and complex network. Students configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network. This is the first of two courses needed in order to take the Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices 2 (ICND 2) Exam. Upon completion of this exam (and having passed the ICND 1 exam), the student earns the title of Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA).

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSCO 2010  or instructor approval.
  
  • CSCO 2025 - Cisco: Advanced Internetworking III


    Credits: 3
    Students plan and design WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. Students analyze network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols as well as implementing IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. This is the second of two courses needed in order to take the Interconnecting Cisco Network Devices 2 (ICND 2) Exam. Upon completion of this exam (and having passed the ICND 1 exam), the student earns the title of Cisco Certified Networking Associate (CCNA).

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSCO 2020 .

Computer Applications-Computer Security

  
  • CSEC 1500 - Network Security Fundamentals


    Credits: 3
    Students gain a fundamental understanding of computer and network security and explore a wide variety of concepts related to computer security. This course prepares the student for the CompTIA Security+ Certification.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CSCO 2000 .
  
  • CSEC 1510 - Network Defense Principles


    Credits: 3
    Students employ knowledge and gain experience installing firewalls and intrusion detection systems. Students develop a solid foundation in advanced network security fundamentals, intrusion detection systems, network address translation, packet filtering, proxy servers, firewalls, and virtual private networks. Students explore network defense fundamentals, critical system analysis, risk analysis, security policy implementation, network traffic signatures, virtual private network concepts and implementation, incident response, and firewall management as well as systems and services security.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSEC 1500 , CSCO 2000 , and CMAP 1960 .
  
  • CSEC 1520 - Network Attack Principles


    Credits: 3
    Students scan, test, hack, and secure systems in an interactive lab environment. Students analyze perimeter defenses and attacker tactics, as well as intrusion detection, policy creation, social engineering, DDoS Attacks, buffer overflows, and virus creation. This course will help prepare the student for the EC-Council Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) Certification.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CSCO 2000 .
  
  • CSEC 1530 - Computer Forensics


    Credits: 3
    Students employ a detailed methodological approach to computer forensics and evidence analysis. Students demonstrate the skills necessary to acquire and handle digital evidence, identify and track cybercriminals, and complete computer investigations.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CSCO 2000  and CMAP 1615  or current A+ certification.
  
  • CSEC 1540 - Incident Response


    Credits: 3
    Students detect how and when data breaches occurred, identify compromised and affected systems, and determine what data attackers took or changed. In addition, students perform containment
    and remediation of incidents, and research threat intelligence. This course helps prepare students for the CompTIA CySA+ exam, which will be presented at the conclusion of the course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSEC 1500  or current CompTIA Security certification or instructor consent.
  
  • CSEC 1550 - Malware Analysis and Reverse Engineering


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate dynamic and static malware analysis on all major files types, carve malicious code from executables, and demonstrate how to recognize common malware tactics.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSEC 1500  or valid CompTIA Security certification or instructor consent.
  
  • CSEC 1560 - Cyber Security Analysis


    Credits: 3
    Students examine defensive cyber operations and tactics. Students actively defend information systems through threat intelligence, monitoring, and remediation of attacks. This course helps prepare students for the Cisco CyberOps Associate certification.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CSEC 1540  or instructor consent.
  
  • CSEC 2013 - Cybersecurity Capstone


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout the Cybersecurity program within a Cyber Range, a controlled virtual environment designed to test student ability to protect systems against cyber attacks under realistic conditions. After completion of the practical portion of the lab, students develop a new policy or procedure to add to current cybersecurity practices. Instructor consent required.

  
  • CSEC 2395 - Cybersecurity Capstone


    Credits: 3
    Students demonstrate the knowledge and skills they have acquired throughout the Cybersecurity program within a Cyber Range, a controlled virtual environment designed to test student ability to protect systems against cyber attacks under realistic conditions. After completion of the practical portion of the lab, students develop a new policy or procedure to add to current cybersecurity practices. Instructor consent required.


Computer Applications-Linux

  
  • LINX 2500 - Linux Administration I


    Credits: 4
    Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to install and administer Linux-Based systems. Students examine the basic concepts of Linux/UNIX operating systems and architecture. Topics covered include installation, boot managers, Linux desktop, help resources, software management, file and directory structure, command line administration, process management, and basic network and security configurations. Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to install, configure, and administer a basic Linux system. This course also provides a base from which students can study to pass the LPI-1, 101 (LXO-103) exam (Part 1 of 2) for the Linux and LPIC-1 certifications.

  
  • LINX 2510 - Linux Administration II


    Credits: 4
    Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to install and administer Linux systems. Students illustrate Linux bash-shell scripts and data management. Students demonstrate user interfaces management and system administration. Students also learn to manage system services, networks, and security configurations. This course helps prepare students to take the LPIC-1 exam 102 (LXO-104) and earn the LPI LPIC-1 as well as the CompTIA Linux certification.

    Prerequisite: Completion of LINX 2500 .

Computer Applications-Microsoft Technology

  
  • MSFT 2578 - Networking Essentials


    Credits: 4
    A course designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to understand the local area networking information in Microsoft courses on work­stations and networking. The course serves as a general introduction for students who need a foundation in current networking technology for local area networks (LANs), wide area networks (WANs), and the Internet.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
  
  • MSFT 2600 - Implementing Microsoft Windows Desktop


    Credits: 4
    Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to install, manage, and maintain professional Microsoft Windows desktop environments. Students install, manage, and maintain current Microsoft Windows operating systems; manage local accounts and configure permission to resources; and manage security, network resources, printers, and group policies. This course is intended for help desk, desktop, and systems administrators who work in a Microsoft networked environment and prepares students to test for the Microsoft Windows Desktop Configuration Certification.

  
  • MSFT 2700 - Microsoft Systems Associate I Servers


    Credits: 4
    Students gain the knowledge and skills necessary to install, configure and maintain Microsoft server environments. Students configure and manage Active Directory servers and accounts; design and implement storage solutions, including virtual and network-based storage; configure Hyper-V virtualization and High Availability including clustering and system recovery; manage Windows containers using Docker CLI and PowerShell for Docker as well as managing container images using Microsoft Azure. 

  
  • MSFT 2710 - Microsoft Systems Associate II


    Credits: 4
    Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary for implementing, managing, and maintaining the network infrastructure in a Windows Server environment. Students configure and troubleshoot name resolution (DNS), Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP), IPv4 and IPv6 Addressing, Group Policy Objects (GPO), implementing remote access solutions such as DirectAccess and VPNs, implementing network policies and network access protection, as well as update management and monitoring of Windows systems. This course helps prepare students to take the Microsoft 70-741 exam.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MSFT 2700  or instructor approval.
  
  • MSFT 2715 - Microsoft Systems Associate III Administration


    Credits: 4
    Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary for designing, implementing, and managing a Microsoft Active Directory infrastructure using graphical tools and PowerShell scripting. Students deploy, manage, and maintain Active Directory sites, Group Policy Objects (GPO), certificate authorities (CA), and Federation Services (FS). Students implement Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS), and Microsoft Azure AD. Students will understand how to secure AD DS as well as monitor and troubleshoot AD DS services. This course prepares students to take the Microsoft 70-742 Exam.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MSFT 2700  or instructor consent.
  
  • MSFT 2800 - Implementing Microsoft Server Virtualization


    Credits: 4
    Student develop the knowledge and skills necessary to design and administer Microsoft server virtualization. Students install and configure Microsoft Hyper-V and VMWare virtual environments. Students design and manage virtual machines and virtual networking. Students also manage virtual resources including storage, networking, processing, clusters, and memory. Students learn to manage virtual machine replication, remote desktop, and cloud environments. Students learn to monitor and optimize virtual machines as well as backup and restore them.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MSFT 2700  or instructor approval.
  
  • MSFT 2810 - Microsoft SQL Server Administration


    Credits: 4
    Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to design and administer Microsoft SQL servers and SQL databases. Students install and configure Microsoft SQL servers. Students design and manage SQL tables, views, databases, stored procedures, and reports. Students also configure user accounts, authentication and permissions for SQL databases. Students also learn to monitor, optimize and backup SQL servers.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MSFT 2700  or instructor approval.
  
  • MSFT 2900 - Microsoft Project Management


    Credits: 4
    Students learn to plan, design and manage technical projects. Students develop the knowledge and skills necessary to plan, design and manage technology-based projects effectively in order to meet the business needs. Students plan and design Microsoft systems and networks through the Project Management processes detailed in the Project Management Book of Knowledge (PMBOK). Students develop a project plan which addresses all phases of a successful project. Students use project management tools to aid in the design and implementation of their projects.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MSFT 2700  or instructor approval.

Computer Science

  
  • COSC 1010 - Introduction to Computer Science


    Credits: 4
    Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of computer programming and the programming development cycle. Given varied problems students will analyze, design, implement, and test solutions utilizing a contemporary computer programming language. Solutions will become more complex as the course progresses. Students will ultimately utilize simple data types, input/output statements, strings, control structures, and modules. Students will employ sound software engineering principles and debugging techniques.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in MATH 1400  or higher.
  
  • COSC 1030 - Computer Science I


    Credits: 4
    Students continue using the programming development cycle (analyze, design, code, and test) while expanding their programming skills to include Graphical User Interfaces (GUI), object-oriented programming, arrays, file I/O, character I/O, dynamic memory allocation, and strings.

    Prerequisite: Completion of COSC 1010 .
  
  • COSC 1490A - Topics: Programming Apps for Android Devices


    Credits: 3
    In this intermediate-level programming course, students learn to program apps for Android devices (apps are application programs for smartphone and tablet devices). Students use the Eclipse IDE and both the Java and Android SDKs (the programming environment that the vast majority of Android programmers use) to create fully functional apps for Android devices. All software required is free for download and available for Windows, Mac, and Linux platforms. An Android device is not required, but if students have one, they may utilize it.

    Prerequisite: Completion of COSC 1010  or permission of instructor.
  
  • COSC 2030 - Computer Science II


    Credits: 4
    Students experiment with the use and implementation of abstract data structures in an object-oriented programming environment. Topics include lists, stacks, queues, tables, binary trees, graphs, space and time complexity, recursion, and recursive data types. Programming exercises and experimentation with software in a closed laboratory supplement the discussion.

    Prerequisite: Completion of COSC 1030 .
  
  • COSC 2300 - Discrete Structures


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to the mathematical concepts that serve as foundations of computer sciences: logic, set theory, relations and functions, graphs (directed and undirected), inductively defined structures (lists and trees), and applications of mathematical induction. Provides an introduction to abstract and rigorous thinking in advanced mathematics and computer sciences. Cross-listed with MATH 2300 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of COSC 1030  or MATH 2200  or MATH 2350 .
  
  • COSC 2409 - Programming


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to the fundamental concepts of computer programming and the programming development cycle. Given varied problems students will analyze, design, implement, and test solutions utilizing a contemporary computer programming language. Solutions will become more complex as the course progresses. Students will ultimately utilize basic features of the chosen language such as simple data types, input/output statements, strings, control structures, and modules. Students will employ sound software engineering principles and debugging techniques.


Construction Management

  
  • CMGT 1520 - Introduction to Blueprint Reading and Building Codes


    Credits: 3
    Students acquire knowledge about the complexities of modern construction and related technologies. Students learn to read, understand, and interpret construction drawings for both commercial and residential construction. Students examine how design parameters and construction methods relate to codes and specifications.


Counseling

  
  • CNSL 2300 - Counseling Skills for Helping Professionals


    Credits: 3
    Students discuss and apply basic counseling and communication skills. In addition, students develop and demonstrate use of basic skills including listening, responding, encouraging, and initiating change in interpersonal communication through mediation and conflict resolution. Students engage in self-examiniation in preparation for going into the helping profession.

    Prerequisite: Completion of PSYC 1000 .

Criminal Justice

  
  • CRMJ 1510 - Police Science I


    Credits: 3
    A study of the role of the police and policing in American society and an examination of the pattern of relations between police and the public. Students become knowledgeable about the nature of police organizations and police work within the context of a broad social, political, and legal framework.

    Prerequisite: Completion of CRMJ 2120  or consent of instructor.
  
  • CRMJ 2120 - Introduction to Criminal Justice


    Credits: 3
    An overview course regarding the criminal justice system and how it relates to the administration of justice in our complex society. Students study a survey of philosophies, functions and methods of social control with emphasis on the role of law and those involved in its administration, i.e. police, courts, and corrections organizations which includes a study of history, organization process and problems related to law and justice agencies in a heterogeneous, democratic society.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
  • CRMJ 2130 - Criminal Investigation I


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the fundamentals of criminal investigation. This class is designed for students considering careers in law enforcement or criminal justice as well as for those already in the field.

    Prerequisite: Completion of concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2120  or instructor consent.
  
  • CRMJ 2135 - Criminal Investigation II


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the crime laboratory as an integral part of criminal investigation. Topics include an overview of the historical development of forensic sciences; descriptions and applications of various scientific techniques used in the study of crimes; the collection, preservation, and recognition of evidence; and laboratory techniques.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2130  or instructor approval.
  
  • CRMJ 2210 - Criminal Law I


    Credits: 3
    Students explore substantive criminal law as a formal means of social control. Students view criminal law from the perspective of criminal justice, law, anthropology, sociology, and psychology. This course is intended for both non-majors and majors in law enforcement, corrections and pre-law.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2120  or instructor approval.
  
  • CRMJ 2280 - Criminal Procedure


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the basic individual rights protected under the United States Constitution and how these rights come into conflict with the maintenance of public order and the enforcement of the criminal laws of the United States and individual states. Topics include an overview of the criminal court system and the arena in which legal conflict is resolved, law of arrest, search and seizure, confessions, pretrial
    identifications, the exclusionary rule, privacy, probable cause, reasonable doubt, and those rights guaranteed by the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2120  or instructor approval.
  
  • CRMJ 2350 - Introduction to Corrections


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the development and philosophy of the American correctional system. Topics include treatment and punishment of adults and juveniles in both community and institutionally-based alternatives. This course is designed for both nonmajors and majors in criminal justice.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in CRMJ 2120  or instructor approval.
 

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