LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 
    
    Nov 29, 2022  
LCCC Catalog 2021-2022 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Prerequisites

A prerequisite is designed to help students be successful. Prerequisites also inform prospective students what body of knowledge is necessary to be successful in a particular course.

If a prerequisite course is listed for a subsequent course, the student must have completed satisfactorily (grade of C or better) the prerequisite course, scored at an equivalent level of placement using with high school GPA or ACT, or completed an equivalent course at a college/university that holds institutional accreditation through an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education. Equivalent courses must be demonstrated by submitting an official transcript, and final determination will be made by the Office of the Registrar. For additional information, please refer to the “Academic Skills Assessment and Placement Policy ”.

The college has designated English and math prerequisite skill levels for many of the courses in the curriculum. The table below equates placement test levels with a specific developmental course.

This sample course description identifies how to determine the prerequisites for a given course.

PHYS 1050 - Concepts of Physics


Credits: 4
General Education: Natural Sciences - Physical (NSP)

In this introductory course, students become familiar with the science of matter interacting with energy in a variety of fields. Students demonstrate their competencies in the scientific method, properties of matter, mechanics, heat, sound, light, electricity and magnetism, radiation, and atomic and nuclear interactions. This course is recommended for students in the paramedical sciences- medical terminology, radiographic technology, sonography, exercise science, applied technology, and other non-science majors requiring a lab science course. Student receiving credit for PHYS 1050 cannot receive credit for PHYS 1110  or PHYS 1310 . Offered in Spring semester only.

Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0975  or higher or instructor permission. Placement or enrollment in ENGL 1010  recommended.

Students registering for PHYS 1050 must have completed successfully:

 

Radiology Technology

  
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    RDTK 1620 - Radiation Biology and Protection


    Credits: 3
    Students investigate the types and sources of radiation, outlining radiation’s biological effects on atoms, cells, and human populations at various doses and delivery methods. Students describe the United States governmental regulations regarding radiation and practice effective radiation protection and measurement methods for patients and occupational personnel while in a medical setting.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ZOO 2025  or instructor approval, and acceptance into the Radiography program.
  
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    RDTK 1683 - Radiographic Procedures II


    Credits: 3
    Students analyze and perform routine procedures of bone densitometry (DEXA), routine contrast media fluoroscopy examinations, and C-arm use in surgical and non-surgical settings. Students safely administer contrast media for routine procedures such as arthrography, myelography, and angiography.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1583  and RDTK 1584 .
  
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    RDTK 1684 - Radiographic Lab II


    Credits: 1
    A course to be taken concurrently with RDTK 1683 . Upon successful completion of this course, students are able to perform routine and special fluoroscopic exams such as anthrography, myelography, and angiography, and operate a C-arm fluoroscopic unit in both a surgical and departmental setting in a competent manner through simulated applications.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RDTK 1683 .
  
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    RDTK 1713 - Clinical Education II


    Credits: 4
    This is a clinical experience in the radiology department. The course is to be taken during Summer Session I. Students refine positioning skills previously learned and positioning learned in RDTK 1683 . Under supervision in the clinical setting, the student will be able to competently perform routine diagnostic imaging of extremity, spines, chest, and abdominal work. In addition, 20 hours of shift work after 4 p.m. or on weekends is required. The student will be expected to pass a competency-based imaging test at the end of the semester.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1503 .
  
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    RDTK 2510 - Clinical Education III


    Credits: 7
    This is a clinical experience course in the radiology environment. The course is to be taken during Fall II. Students refine skills learned previously, including patient skills, implementing new technical skills, further building their practical experience in fluoroscopy diagnostic studies and introducing skull work. Students demonstrate competency in gastrointestinal, urinary, trauma, and portable work.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1713 .
  
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    RDTK 2583 - Radiographic Procedures III


    Credits: 3
    This course covers anatomy and positioning of the cranium and facial bones as well as basic cross-sectional anatomy of the cranium. Students demonstrate proficiency in and knowledge of skull radiography through didactic and competency testing.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1683  and RDTK 1684 .
  
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    RDTK 2584 - Radiographic Lab III


    Credits: 1
    This lab course is to be taken concurrently with RDTK 2583  and affords the student the opportunity to expose and critique skull radiographs in the radiographic laboratory. The student radiographer positions, exposes, and critiques skull procedures as well as identifies basic cross-sectional anatomy of the head.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RDTK 2583 .
  
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    RDTK 2603 - Survey of Technical Specialties


    Credits: 2
    Students examine current and developing imaging and/or therapeutic technologies such as computed tomography (CT), mammography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), ultrasonography, nuclear medicine, and radiation therapy. Students have the opportunity to apply this knowledge to Clinical Education IV.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 2583 .
  
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    RDTK 2613 - Clinical Education IV


    Credits: 7
    A course to be taken during Spring II semester. Students practice all general radiographic and fluoroscopic procedures with emphasis on advanced fluoroscopic and skull techniques. Under supervision students will be applying technical knowledge learned in the classroom lab. Students will be expected to pass a competency-based imaging test at the end of the semester. Students demonstrate identified skills needed by a fully functional radiogra­pher.

    Prerequisite: Second-year radiography status and completion of RDTK 2510 .
  
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    RDTK 2623 - Radiographic Equipment, Digital Imaging and Quality Assurance


    Credits: 3
    In this course, students develop skills conducting quality assurance tests, artifact analysis, troubleshooting imaging problems, and standardizing numerous exposure variables. Students describe the components and function of fluoroscopic imaging equipment and digital imaging equipment used in contemporary radiology departments and review basic electrical circuity with special emphasis on the circuits of X-ray equipment.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1610  and RDTK 1611 .
  
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    RDTK 2624 - Radiographic Lab IV


    Credits: 1
    A course to be taken concurrently with RDTK 2623 . Students gain experience using fluoroscopic and digital imaging equipment and analyzing the resulting images. Students also conduct routine equipment quality control tests used in the maintenance and testing of radiographic equipment, analyze radiographs for artifacts, and problem solve through various laboratory experiments.

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 1610  and RDTK 1611 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in RDTK 2623 .
  
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    RDTK 2630 - Radiographic Pathology


    Credits: 1
    Students survey the radiographic demonstration of pathology for all the major human body systems. Students will learn about the medical and radiographic diagnostic process and apply this knowledge to radiographic evaluation. Students evaluate patient histories and conditions, altering appropriate technical factors and exam protocols, as appropriate. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 2583 .
  
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    RDTK 2900 - Radiography Seminar


    Credits: 4
    Students prepare for successful completion of the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists’ (ARRT) national certifying examination by completing a comprehensive review of all prior courses in the radiography curriculum. Students develop and refine the analytical and test-taking skills necessary for passing the national certifying examination in Radiography. Students complete personal research and participate in group activities and discussions to synthesize knowledge, attitudes, and skills in professional radiographic practice. 

    Prerequisite: Completion of RDTK 2623 
  
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    RDTK 2950 - Computed Tomography Registry Preparation for Technologists


    Credits: 3
    A course preparing registered radiologic technologists for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists national certifying examination for Computed Tomography (CT). Students complete a comprehensive review of radiation physics and are introduced to elements that will be included in the examination, such as CT instrumentation and image production, radiation safety and dosimetry, patient communication and contrast administration principles, and medical CT protocols for musculoskeletal, trunk, and neurological examinations. Enrollment qualification: Students must be registered in radiography (or registry-eligible) by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT).

  
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    RDTK 2952 - Advanced Modality Clinical Education


    Credits: 1-5
    This is a clinical experience in a medical imaging department. Under supervision in the clinical setting, the student performs the medical imaging procedures and competencies required by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) in the specified area of advanced modality practiced. Student will demonstrate safe patient care techniques and will acquire and analyze medical images/data for diagnostic quality. This course may be repeated if additional clinical time or experience is needed to complete all of the specified ARRT competencies for advanced certification or if the student is pursuing a credential in a new advanced modality. Credit hours are awarded on a 1:45 contact hour basis. The amount of credit hours enrolled will be determined on a case-by-case basis.

    Prerequisite: ARRT-certified, satisfaction of clinical clearance requirements (such as background checks, immunizations, and drug screening), and permission of the instructor.
  
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    RDTK 2991 - MRI Registry Prep for the Technologist


    Credits: 3
    A course preparing registered radiologic technologists for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists national certifying examination for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI.) Students complete a comprehensive review of MRI and are introduced to elements that will be included in the examination, such as MRI instrumentation and image acquisition, MRI screening and magnetic field safety requirements, patient communication and contrast administration principles, and medical MRI protocols for neurological, trunk, and musculoskeletal examinations. Enrollment qualifications: Instructor permission required. Students must be registered by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) in Radiography, or be Registry-eligible.


Sheetmetal Apprentice

  
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    SMAP 1910 - Intro to Sheet Metal Duct and Duct Fabrication


    Credits: 3
    Students learn the basic techniques of the sheet metal trade and how it is utilized in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning applications. Students summarize the history and development of the sheet metal trades and learn how to use the trade tools including hand, power, layout, cutting, bending, and forming machine tools. Students learn the layout of sheet metal, sheet metal trade mathematics, and the first steps of fabrication.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
  
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    SMAP 1920 - Sheet Metal Field Measurements and Duct Design


    Credits: 3
    Students expand on knowledge from SMAP 1910  and apply techniques in real-world settings. Students describe the techniques and practice them in-field measuring and layout of duct runs and fittings. Students learn sheet metal layout software and the use of a CNC plasma cutting system. The processes of planning, designing, drawing, fabricating, and installing duct runs are introduced. Students also learn effective communication techniques to utilize between field and shop personnel.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SMAP 1910 .
  
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    SMAP 1930 - Plans, Specs, and Crew Leaders


    Credits: 3
    Students use a case-study approach to learning how to use building plans and specifications to lay-out, fabricate, and install HVAC systems. Students will understand skills required to supervise personnel, build teams, communicate and motivate while discussing gender and cultural issues. Emphasizes principles of project planning and management, including problem solving and decision making.

  
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    SMAP 1940 - Journeyman Preparation Course


    Credits: 3
    Students learn to navigate and interpret the International Mechanical Code Book, International Fuel Gas Code Book and the National Electrical Code Book. Students learn test taking and time management skills while taking mock journeymen tests. Students simulate going before a mock board comprised of local industry members to present a portfolio of recent jobs where they demonstrate skills learned during their apprenticeship.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SMAP 1930 .
  
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    SMAP 1950 - Sheetmetal Apprentice V


    Credits: 3
    Provide students with the job skills necessary to enter, remain or advance as a member of the local sheetmetal workforce.

  
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    SMAP 1960 - Sheetmetal Apprentice VI


    Credits: 3
    Provide students with the job skills necessary to enter, remain or advance as a member of the local sheetmetal workforce.

  
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    SMAP 1970 - Sheetmetal Apprentice VII


    Credits: 3
    Provide students with the job skills necessary to enter, remain or advance as a member of the local sheetmetal workforce.

  
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    SMAP 1980 - Sheetmetal Apprentice VIII


    Credits: 3
    Provide students with the job skills necessary to enter, remain or advance as a member of the local sheetmetal workforce.


Social Work

  
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    SOWK 2000 - Intro to Social Work


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the history, mission, values, and activities of social work practice. Students also investigate how social workers interact with a diverse client population and contribute to solving social problems. Lastly, students develop awareness of the knowledge and value base of the social work profession.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  or equivalent placement.

Sociology

  
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    SOC 1000 - Sociological Principles


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    An introductory course in sociology in which students demonstrate an understanding of the basic principles involved in interpersonal relationships, social group behavior, and institutional structures ranging from small groups, networks, and families to bureaucracies, social stratification, and urban living.

  
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    SOC 1080 - Introduction to Women’s Studies


    Credits: 3
    An introduction to the key issues in women’s studies. Students examine women’s participation in, and relationship to, institutions of society such as family and school, as well as processes and activities such as work, art, literature and politics in historical and cross-cultural analysis. Cross-listed with HUMN 1080 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
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    SOC 1150 - Sociology of Sport


    Credits: 3
    Students investigate the institution of organized sport from a sociological perspective. Students examine the ways sport is a microcosm of society as well as how sport creates, reproduces and changes society. Students examine how common sociological concepts such as stratification, discrimination, norms, mobility, violence, and social structure are evidenced in professional and amateur athletics.

  
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    SOC 2400 - Criminology


    Credits: 3
    An introductory overview of criminal behavior and its impact on the criminal justice system. Students discover theories of criminal behavior, examination and analysis of statistics on crime, explanations of crime causation, and the relationship between crime and the criminal justice process. Cross-listed with CRMJ 2400 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of CRMJ 2120  or SOC 1000 , or instructor approval.

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 1010 - First Year Spanish I


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    Students develop basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the Spanish language and explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

  
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    SPAN 1020 - First Year Spanish II


    Credits: 4
    Students continue their development of basic speaking, listening, reading and writing skills in the target language and explore cultural aspects of the Spanish-speaking world.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1010 .
  
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    SPAN 1055 - Spanish in the Workplace I


    Credits: 3
    This course is designed for students and professionals in the workplace. Students will focus on the communication skills and the specialized vocabulary needed to be able to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking clients. Students will also examine types of cultural differences which need to be considered when communicating with someone from a different country.

  
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    SPAN 1065 - Spanish in the Workplace II


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of Spanish 1055 and is designed for students and professionals in the workplace. Students continue their development of communication skills and specialized vocabulary to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking clients. Students interpret cultural differences and apply appropriate communication with Spanish-speaking clients. Students demonstrate ability to identify and employ workplace-related language for situations that are studied in the course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1055  or instructor approval.
  
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    SPAN 1070 - Spanish for Healthcare Personnel I


    Credits: 2
    This course is designed for students and professionals in the healthcare field. Students focus on the communication skills and specialized vocabulary needed to be able to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking patients. Students also examine types of cultural differences which need to be considered when communicating with someone from a different country.

  
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    SPAN 1071 - Intensive Spanish Abroad Conversation


    Credits: 3
    Students improve skills in Spanish oral proficiency by participating in a three-week intensive Spanish course abroad. Students take part in class at a private language school. Students develop an understanding of the host country’s culture through living with a local family for the duration of the program; visits to local museums, churches, markets, and other cultural historical sites; and travel outside of the host city during two of the three weekends spent in the host country. Students are required to use their oral linguistic skills by participating in volunteer programs at area orphanages, hospitals, and schools during the week. Students enrolling in this course are required to participate in four monthly informative meetings prior to their study abroad.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1020 .
  
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    SPAN 1075 - Spanish in the Workplace III


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of Spanish 1065 and is designed for students and professionals in the workplace. Students continue their development of communication skills and specialized vocabulary to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking clients. Students interpret cultural differences and apply appropriate communication at novice-high level with Spanish-speaking clients. Students demonstrate ability to elicit as well as identify and employ workplace-related language for situations that are studied in the course at a novice-high level.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1065  or instructor approval.
  
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    SPAN 1080 - Spanish for Healthcare Personnel II


    Credits: 2
    This course is a continuation of SPAN 1070  and is designed for students and professionals in the healthcare field. Students continue their development of communication skills and specialized vocabulary to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking patients. Students interpret cultural differences and apply appropriate communication with Spanish-speaking patients. Students demonstrate ability to identify and employ diagnostic language for ailments that are studied in the course.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1070  or instructor approval.
  
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    SPAN 1085 - Spanish in the Workplace IV


    Credits: 3
    This course is a continuation of Spanish 1075 and is designed for students and professionals in the workplace. Students continue their development of communication skills and specialized vocabulary to communicate effectively with Spanish-speaking clients in all tenses and moods. Students identify and interpret cultural differences and apply appropriate communication at an intermediate level with Spanish-speaking clients. Students demonstrate ability to elicit information as well as identify and employ workplace-related language for situations that are studied in the course at an intermediate level.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1075  or instructor approval.
  
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    SPAN 2030 - Second Year Spanish I


    Credits: 4
    In this intermediate-level Spanish course students refine their conversation skills and integrate intermediate level grammatical structures into conversations and compo­sitions. Students are exposed to Spanish literature and develop more advanced writing skills in Spanish.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 1020  or equivalent.
  
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    SPAN 2040 - Second Year Spanish II


    Credits: 4
    In this continuation of Spanish, students improve their self-expression skills in conversation as well as their reading comprehension. Students practice usage of the language through composition, oral presentations, and grammar review.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 2030  or equivalent 3rd semester course.
  
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    SPAN 2070 - Intensive Spanish Abroad


    Credits: 3
    Students develop skills in speaking, reading, and writing Spanish by participating in a three-week intensive Spanish course/program abroad. As part of the program, students take part in a small class at a private language school. Students also develop an understanding of the host country’s culture through living with a local family for the duration of the program; visits to local museums, churches, markets, and other cultural and historical sites; and travel outside of the host city during two of the three weekends spent in the host country. In addition, students may be requested to participate in volunteer programs at area orphanages, hospitals, and schools during the week. Furthermore, students participate in two weekends of planned group travel outside the host city for further cultural enhancement. Students enrolling in this course participate in four monthly informative meetings prior to their study abroad. A travel waiver and other documents will be required. LCCC provides a faculty escort during the length of the program. Note: This may vary from year to year according to the country where the program takes place. More information will be given during the first meeting. Students must abide by the study abroad short term policy. Besides tuition students pay fees which include their round trip airfare, room and board with local family, classes, local tours, and other activities to the hose academic institution and/or other participating travel agencies.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SPAN 2030  or instructor approval.

Speech-Language Pathology

  
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    SLPA 1500 - Introduction to Speech Language Pathology Assistant


    Credits: 3
    Students explore the field of speech-language pathology, including professional standards, legal and ethical issues, and scope of responsibilities of the speech-language pathologist and the speech-language pathology assistant in health care and educational settings.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval required.
  
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    SLPA 1502 - Field Observation I


    Credits: 1
    Students begin clinical observation of practices and procedures in speech-language pathology and combine on-site observations with online discussions and writing of observational reports. A minimum of 10 hours of observation in educational and medical settings is required.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1500 .
  
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    SLPA 1503 - SLPA Seminar


    Credits: 1
    Students explore the roles and responsibilities of the SLPA. Students explore tools and skills necessary for employment and professional development as an SLPA.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 2502 .
  
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    SLPA 1504 - Anatomy & Physiology of Speech and Hearing


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the fundamentals of anatomy, physiology and neurology related to speech production and hearing. Systems reviewed include respiration, phonation, articulation, resonation, hearing and neurological.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval required.
  
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    SLPA 1505 - Introduction to Speech and Language Development


    Credits: 3
    This course provides a theoretical and descriptive framework in the study of language development. In this course students explore the fundamental stages and processes of language development. Students study the components of the language system (phonology, morphology, semantics, syntax, and pragmatics) as well as the development of these components. The primary focus is on typical patterns of development; however, the development of language in special populations: speakers of a variety of dialects, second-language learners, and individuals with a variety of disabilities and impairments such as autism, SLI (specific language disorder), and hearing impairment will also be explored.

    Prerequisite: Instructor approval.
  
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    SLPA 1506 - Introduction to Phonetics


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to the articulatory foundations regarding the description and classification of speech sounds. Students learn the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA), physiological properties of the speech mechanism, methods of transcription and dialectal variations. Students describe sounds based on distinctive features. Students discriminate and identify the correct production of phonemes.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1500 .
  
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    SLPA 1511 - Introduction to Communication Disorders and Treatment


    Credits: 3
    Students are introduced to an overview of communication disorders, including classification, assessment and remediation of speech, language, literacy, swallowing and hearing disorders in children and adults. Students describe the role of the speech-language pathologist and audiologist in educational and medical settings and examines multicultural and multilingual diversity, developmental disabilities, augmentative and alternative communication, as well as collaboration with other professionals.

    Prerequisite: Instructor Approval.
  
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    SLPA 1520 - Voice and Fluency


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the impact of voice and fluency on oral communication.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1506 .
  
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    SLPA 1600 - Introduction to Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation


    Credits: 2
    Students are introduced to audiology, audiograms, hearing screening and hearing assessments. Students are also introduced to aural rehabilitation, and work with hearing aids and hearing assistive technologies (HAT).

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 1605 - Adult Communication Disorders


    Credits: 3
    Students examine adult neurogenic communication disorders including aphasia, dysarthria, apraxia, right hemisphere disorders, dementia, and traumatic brain injury. Students also identify and practice the speech and language treatment techniques used to treat these disorders.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 1630 - Language Disorders and Intervention


    Credits: 3
    Students explore treatment techniques and approaches appropriate for treating language delays and disorders with toddler, preschool, and school-aged populations. Students demonstrate interventions for culturally and linguistically diverse children, as well as intervention for students with learning and developmental disabilities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 2500 - Introduction to Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation


    Credits: 2
    Students are introduced to audiology, audiograms, hearing screening and hearing assessments. Students are also introduced to aural rehabilitation, and work with hearing aids and hearing assistive technologies (HAT).

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 2502 - Field Observation II


    Credits: 2
    Students continue clinical observation of practices and procedures required in speech-language pathology in preparation for clinical fieldwork. Student observations occur in diverse settings including educational, medical, assisted living facilities, and private clinics. Students will have a total of 20 hours of field observation in a variety of the settings noted above. Students write observation reports, lesson plans, treatment objectives, SOAP notes, and complete data collection activities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1502 .
  
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    SLPA 2503 - SLPA Seminar


    Credits: 1
    Students explore the roles and responsibilities of the SLPA. Students explore tools and skills necessary for employment and professional development as an SLPA.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 2502 .
  
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    SLPA 2505 - Adult Communication Disorders


    Credits: 3
    Students examine adult neurogenic communication disorders including aphasia, dysarthria, apraxia, right hemisphere disorders, dementia, and traumatic brain injury. Students also identify the speech and language therapy techniques used to treat these disorders.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 2520 - Speech Sound Disorders and Intervention


    Credits: 3
    Students discriminate between articulation and phonological disorders as well as treatment approaches specific to each. Students examine session planning, reporting progress and organization of therapy interaction. Students demonstrate cueing, reinforcement, feedback and choosing materials.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1506 .
  
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    SLPA 2530 - Language Disorders and Intervention


    Credits: 3
    Students explore therapy techniques appropriate for treating language delays and acquired disorders with toddler, preschool, and school-aged populations. Students demonstrate interventions for culturally and linguistically diverse children, as well as intervention for students with learning and developmental disabilities.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 2535 - Special Populations for SLPA


    Credits: 2
    Students focus on speech and language treatment techniques and approaches with childhood low-incidence populations (such as craniofacial anomalies, TBI, Cerebral Palsy, genetic disorders, Autism Spectrum Disorder, and syndromes).

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1511 .
  
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    SLPA 2540 - Speech Disorders


    Credits: 3
    Students examine the impact of speech disorders on oral communication. Students identify treatment approaches specific to various speech disorders including voice, resonance, fluency and apraxia. Students examine session planning, progress reporting and organization of treatment sessions. Students practice treatment approaches and techniques for various speech disorders.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1504 .
  
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    SLPA 2600 - Alternative and Augmentative Communication


    Credits: 2
    Students utilize common forms of augmentative and alternative communication, including sign language, communication boards, and electronic or computer-based communication.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1630 .
  
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    SLPA 2601 - Screening Processes


    Credits: 3
    Students implement screening tools and processes used for speech, language, and hearing screening, including the administration of screenings and the completion of protocols with clients of varied ages.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SLPA 1630 .
  
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    SLPA 2602 - Internship Management and Procedures


    Credits: 4
    Students examine organizational and functional skills required in the speech-language pathology workplace. It includes interdisciplinary and supervisory relationships, client and public interaction, safety issues, ethical issues, technical writing, lesson plan development, data collection, record keeping, multicultural issues, and behavior management.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in SLPA 2970 .
  
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    SLPA 2970 - SLPA Internship


    Credits: 6
    Students practice the skills necessary for screening and treatment of language and speech disorders. Students are required to obtain 270 hours at the internship site with a minimum of 100 hours of those 270 hours providing direct speech and language treatments or screenings with clients under the direct supervision of an ASHA-certified Speech Language Pathologist.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in SLPA 2602 .

Statistics

  
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    STAT 0980 - Skills Development for Fundamentals of Statistics


    Credits: 3
    Students practice mathematical and reasoning skills to improve their success in STAT 2050  Fundamentals of Statistics. Topics covered in this course include those defined in STAT 2050  and/or any prerequisite skills needed by the student. Students must concurrently enroll in a corresponding section of STAT 2050 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of Concurrent enrollment in MATH 0900  or equivalent placement.
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in STAT 2050 .
  
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    STAT 0990 - Skills Development for Introductory Statistics for the Social Sciences


    Credits: 3
    Students practice mathematical and reasoning skills to improve their success in STAT 2070  Introductory Statistics for the Social Sciences. Topics covered in this course include those defined in STAT 2070  and/or any prerequisite skills needed by the student. Students must concurrently enroll in a corresponding section of STAT 2070 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0900  or equivalent placement.
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in STAT 2070 .
  
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    STAT 2010 - Business Statistics


    Credits: 4
    Students examine statistical concepts used in business applications. Students identify types of data and their appropriate descriptive and inferential statistics; calculate and interpret descriptive measures for data sets; explore the role of probability distributions in statistical inference; construct confidence intervals; conduct and interpret one-group and two-group hypothesis tests; apply the appropriate statistical technique to solve various business applications; and use statistical computer software. Credit cannot be earned in more than one of the following courses: STAT 2010, STAT 2050  and STAT 2070 .

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 1010  or equivalent placement and MATH 1400  or higher, or equivalent placement.
  
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    STAT 2050 - Fundamentals of Statistics


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Quantitative Literacy (QL)

    Students examine statistical methods used in the natural sciences and health sciences. Students explore the central ideas of descriptive statistics and statistical inference including center and variability, probability and probability models, estimation, hypothesis testing and relationships between variables. Credit cannot be earned in more than one of the following: STAT 2010 , STAT 2050, or STAT 2070 .

  
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    STAT 2070 - Intro Statistics for Social Sciences


    Credits: 4
    General Education: Quantitative Literacy (QL)

    Students examine statistical methods used in behavioral and social sciences. Topics include study design, tables and graphs, center, variability, probability models, estimation, and hypothesis testing. Credit cannot be earned in more than one of the following: STAT 2010 , STAT 2050 , or STAT 2070.


Strategies for Success

  
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    STRT 1000 - Strategies for Success


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Student Success (SS)

    Students develop meaningful relationships with College employees and Pathway professionals while developing a mindset for success throughout life. Through collaboration, problem solving, exploration and action, students will identify transferable skills, develop a network of support and career mentors, and identify strategies to guide continued growth and persistence throughout their lives. Fall and Spring


Surgical Technology

  
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    SURG 1500 - Central Sterile Processing


    Credits: 7
    This course is designed to provide the didactic content and lab experience to meet the standards of the Sterile Processing Technician profession. Students learn the fundamentals of central processing including supplies, services, and distribution of hospital instrumentation, supplies, and equipment. Students learn aseptic techniques, patient care concepts, and theories and practices of central services departments. Students demonstrate cleaning, decontamination, and disinfection of instrumentation and equipment, preparation and packaging, sterilization process, sterile storage and inventory management, documentation and record maintenance which are integral skills of the Sterile Processing Technician.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in SURG 1501 .
  
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    SURG 1501 - Central Sterile Processing Clinical


    Credits: 9
    Students demonstrate expertise in ten areas that include general cleaning, wrapping packaging, assemble instrument/procedure trays, sterilization, storage (clean and sterile), patient care equipment, case carts, linen folding, and distribution. Students complete 405 hours of hands-on experience in Central Processing.

    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in SURG 1500 .
  
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    SURG 1600 - Introduction to Surgical Technology


    Credits: 3
    This course is designed to introduce the students to the profession of surgical technology. Students acquire knowledge of professional requirements and expectations, scope of practice, the surgical team, hospital and other health care delivery systems, the physical environment of surgery, hazards and safety practices, ethical and legal aspects, risk management and liability, credentialing, and professional organizations. In addition, students gain an understanding of the various roles for surgical technologists and specific tasks required to deliver surgical patient care before, during, and after a surgical procedure. Students learn safe surgical practice. Students attain competence in aseptic technique, sterilization and disinfection, surgical equipment, instruments, and supplies. Students apply these concepts to surgical case management.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology Program.
  
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    SURG 1610 - Surgical Technology Theory


    Credits: 4
    Students learn the theory of safe surgical practice, including aseptic technique, sterilization and disinfection, surgical equipment, instruments, and supplies. Students apply these concepts to surgical case management.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology Program.
  
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    SURG 1620 - Surgical Technology Skills Lab I


    Credits: 3
    Students practice entry-level surgical technology skills such as scrubbing, gowning, and gloving, aseptic technique, instrument identification, preparation of the sterile field, safe sharps handling, procedure steps anticipation, and professional behaviors.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology Program.
  
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    SURG 1630 - Surgical Technology Skills Lab II


    Credits: 1
    Students practice and develop intermediate and advanced level surgical technology skills with an emphasis on critical thinking competence in aseptic practice, surgical specialty instrumentation, and advanced anticipation skills.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 1610 .
    Corequisite: Concurrent enrollment in SURG 1750 , SURG 2750  and SURG 1850 .
  
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    SURG 1685 - Surgical Pharmacology


    Credits: 2
    Students gain information necessary for safe medication practice in surgery. Students attain competence in the metric system, medication calculations, fundamental concepts of pharmacology, medication identification and handling, medications used in surgery and at the surgical site, and aspects of anesthesia.

    Prerequisite: Acceptance into the Surgical Technology Program.
  
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    SURG 1750 - Surgical Procedures I


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge and skill in the theoretical aspects of surgical procedures pertinent to initial clinical experiences. Students identify anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic tests, equipment, instruments, supplies, procedural steps, and postoperative patient care concepts for surgical procedures in general, gastrointestinal, obstetrics, gynecology, genitourinary, ophthalmology, and orthopedics.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 1600 , SURG 1620  and SURG 1685 .
  
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    SURG 1850 - Surgical Technology Clinical I


    Credits: 5
    Students correlate theory to practice in an actual surgical setting. Students apply previously learned foundational information and hands-on skills as they perform in the first scrub role in assigned surgical procedures under the supervision of clinical site preceptors. An emphasis is placed on developing competence in basic surgical procedures. Students rotate through various surgical specialties at multiple clinical sites. Students meet with LCCC instructors during Clinical Site visits.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 1600 , SURG 1620  and SURG 1685 .
  
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    SURG 2750 - Surgical Procedures II


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge and skill in the theoretical aspects of surgical procedures pertinent to advanced clinical experiences. Students identify anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, diagnostic tests, equipment, instruments, supplies, procedural steps, and perioperative patient care concepts for surgical procedures in otorhinolaryngology, peripheral vascular, cardiovascular, thoracic, and neurosurgery.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 1750 .
  
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    SURG 2810 - Surgical Technology Clinical Synthesis I


    Credits: 1
    Students assess and analyze the clinical experience. Students maintain accurate documentation of case experiences, research and present case studies, and prepare for the certification examination.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 1600 .
  
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    SURG 2850 - Surgical Technology Clinical II


    Credits: 7
    Students continue to correlate theory to practice in an actual surgical setting. Students apply previously learned foundational information and hands-on skills as they perform in the first scrub role in more complex surgical procedures under the supervision of clinical site preceptors. An emphasis is placed on competence in more complicated surgical procedures as available. Students continue to rotate through various surgical specialties at multiple clinical sites. Students meet with LCCC instructors during Clinical Site visits.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 1850 .
  
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    SURG 2895 - Surgical Technology Clinical Synthesis II


    Credits: 1
    Students continue assessment and analysis of the clinical experience with an emphasis on advanced practice specialties. Students maintain accurate documentation of case experiences, research and present case studies, and prepare for the certification examination.

    Prerequisite: Completion of SURG 2810 .

Theatre

  
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    THEA 1000 - Introduction to Theatre


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Human Cultures (HC)

    Students describe, interpret and appraise the roles and working processes of theatre practitioners. Students analyze the history and collaborate on the assembly and process of a play performance.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or equivalent placement.
  
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    THEA 1100 - Acting I


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students explore beginning acting. Students demonstrate acting skills including objective, obstacle, strategy and tactics through the performance of monologues and scenes.

    Prerequisite: Completion of ENGL 0810  or appropriate placement.
  
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    THEA 2000 - Theatre Production


    Credits: 3
    General Education: Creative Expression (CE)

    Students participate in a theatrical production. Students may either perform in the production or work behind the scenes in a technical area. Performers are cast based on an audition. Students demonstrate professionalism and work with others to achieve a polished production. Performances are required. This course may be repeated for up to 12 credit hours for theatre majors.

  
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    THEA 2010 - Theatrical Backgrounds Drama I


    Credits: 3
    Students explore dramatic literature in Western culture, from the Greeks through the 19th century, studying plays in terms of style, content, theme, theatrical conventions and structure. Students examine each play as a representation of its age and as a placeholder in the dramatic canon. Students watch productions of plays on video and in live performance to supplement the readings.

  
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    THEA 2020 - Theatrical Backgrounds Drama II


    Credits: 3
    Students explore dramatic literature in western culture, from 19th century to the present, studying plays in terms of style, content, theme, theatrical conventions, and structure. Students examine each play as a representation of its age and as a placeholder in the dramatic canon. Students watch productions of plays on video and in live performance to supplement readings.

  
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    THEA 2100 - Acting II


    Credits: 3
    A course to develop the actor’s voice and body for character development and character interaction through the performance of monologues and scenes.

  
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    THEA 2160 - Stage Make-up


    Credits: 3
    Stage Make-Up is designed for the beginning student. Students demonstrate and apply basic theatrical make-up principles and practices. Students implement practical artistic problem-solving and critical thinking skills as they apply stage make-up techniques and theory.

  
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    THEA 2220 - Stagecraft


    Credits: 3
    Stagecraft is an introduction to theatrical technology, tools, and equipment as applied to live performance. This course covers the fundamental practices of the technical methodology of scenic, lighting, and costume design. Students will be introduced to the theories and practice of these areas and will apply these practices towards real or imagined productions.

    Prerequisite: Completion of MATH 0900  or equivalent placement.
  
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    THEA 2720 - Introduction to Stage Combat


    Credits: 3
    Students learn safety and proper technique in staging acts of swordplay and hand-to-hand combat for the theatre. Students practice critical thinking skills in using violence to advance character and story in a dramatic context.


Welding Technology

  
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    WELD 1555 - Welding Technology Safety


    Credits: 2
    Students identify common hazards in welding, appraise material safety data sheets, assess safe techniques to avoid welding fumes, and determine safe techniques for storing and handling compressed gas cylinders. In addition, students verify safe techniques for using electrical components, validate power tool safety, and justify proper lock-out/tag-out procedures. They also evaluate forklift safety procedures, critique proper rigging techniques, and demonstrate correct respirator selection and use along with correct fire extinguisher use.

  
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    WELD 1650 - Print Reading and Welding Symbols


    Credits: 3
    Students interpret welding prints used in the welding industry to include welding symbols, sketching, view representation, orthographic projection, measurement formulas, basic layout, and distortion control. Students build skills in layout, cutout, and assembly of weldments.

  
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    WELD 1655 - Allied Cutting Processes


    Credits: 2
    Students set up equipment and perform cutting and gouging operations utilizing the oxy fuel, air carbon arc, and plasma arc cutting processes. This course will also provide an introduction to blueprint reading.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in WELD 1555 .
  
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    WELD 1755 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding I


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge about equipment and setup, electrodes, and electrode selection used in shielded metal arc welding, utilizing the American Welding Society standards of acceptability to develop manual skills necessary to produce quality single and multiple pass welds in all positions using filler metals such as low hydrogen, non-low hydrogen, and iron powder electrodes commonly used in the welding industry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of or concurrent enrollment in WELD 1555 .
  
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    WELD 1756 - Shielded Metal Arc Welding II


    Credits: 4
    Students explain equipment and setup, electrodes, and electrode selection used in shielded metal arc welding. Students develop manual skills necessary to produce single and multiple pass welds with backing plate in all positions as defined by the American Welding Society standards of acceptability. Students demonstrate proper use of filler metals such as low hydrogen, non-low hydrogen, and iron powder electrodes commonly used in the welding industry and also specified by the American Welding Society.

    Prerequisite: Completion of WELD 1755 .
  
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    WELD 1760 - Advanced Shielded Metal Arc Welding


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge about equipment and setup, electrodes, and electrode selection used in shielded metal arc welding, utilizing the American Welding Society standards of acceptability to develop manual skills necessary to produce quality single and multiple pass welds in all positions using filler metals such as low hydrogen, non-low hydrogen, and iron powder electrodes commonly used in the welding industry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of IST 1520 WELD 1655 , WELD 1755 , WELD 1756  and WELD 2650 .
  
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    WELD 1771 - Gas Metal Arc Welding/Flux Cored Arc Welding


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge about equipment, setup and filler metal selection used in gas metal arc welding, utilizing the American Welding Society standards of acceptability to develop manual skills necessary to produce quality single and multiple pass welds in all positions using filler metals commonly used in the welding industry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of WELD 1755 .
  
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    WELD 1805 - Pipe Welding I


    Credits: 4
    Students gain knowledge about equipment and setup, and electrodes and electrode selection used in shielded metal arc welding. Students utilize the American Welding Society standards of acceptability to develop manual skills necessary to produce quality single and multiple pass welds in 2G and 5G pipe positions using filler metals such as low hydrogen, non-low hydrogen, and iron powder electrodes commonly used in the welding industry.

    Prerequisite: Completion of WELD 1760 .
 

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